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USG Teaching and Learning Conference: Best Practices for Promoting Engaged Student Learning
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Wednesday, April 13
 

8:00am

Registration/Check In - 8am-5pm
Please check in at the Conference Registration Desk and pick up your name badge, conference materials, and printed program information.

Wednesday April 13, 2016 8:00am - 5:00pm
Conference Registration Desk

8:45am

Exhibitors
Please visit our Exhibitors, located in the Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria, to learn about the latest tools and resources. Breaks will be held in the Exhibitor area during the morning and afternoon on Wednesday. The Poster Presentations and the Social Reception on Wednesday evening are also held in the same area, enabling you many opportunities to visit all exhibitors. View the Exhibitors tab above and click on the photo or logo to see further information about each exhibitor.



Wednesday April 13, 2016 8:45am - 7:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

9:00am

Awaken the Force in Your Students: Advising with a Purpose
Paula Bryant, Teresa Teasley

Colleges and universities are being challenged to increase the number of students who complete college on time in the state of Georgia. The purpose of this presentation is to describe how one school of nursing created an advising and counseling center focused on retention and graduation as a new approach to Complete College Georgia. This presentation will describe an innovative approach for student retention based on individual counseling, intrusive advising, and engaged learning strategies to improve progression and retention rates. This session will address best practices for promoting critical thinking skills by using engaged student learning strategies, which support institutional plans for Complete College Georgia. The audience will be involved by participating in one of the active learning strategies used across our curriculum, adaptive quizzing promoting critical thinking skills.

Speakers
avatar for Paula Bryant

Paula Bryant

Senior Lectuere; Retention Specialist, Georgia Southwestern State University
TT

Teresa Teasley

Georgia Southwestern


Wednesday April 13, 2016 9:00am - 9:45am
Room Y/Z

9:00am

Creating a Living Learning Community to Promote Engaged Student Learning
Roberta Berry, William Berry, Joseph Levy, Hailey Loehde-Woolard, Benjamin Rapsas, Laura Winalski

Living learning communities (LLCs) can enhance learning across disciplines, foster holistic learning, and promote peer and faculty-student interaction. How can faculty and campus partners create an LLC that delivers these benefits? Building the LLC infrastructure requires cross-campus collaboration. Students, faculty, and other partners also must collaborate in sustaining and continuously improving an LLC whose members are strongly tied together and in which the benefits of an LLC, in fact, are realized. An LLC director will describe building an infrastructure tailored to students who share an inquiry-driven approach to learning. Students will describe the LLC's benefits and most effective aspects and their partnership in sustaining and improving the LLC. Presenters will participate with audience groups in imagining the design of an LLC, followed by discussion and questions.

Speakers
RB

Roberta Berry

Georgia Institute of Technology
WB

William Berry

Georgia Institute of Technology
JL

Joseph Levy

Georgia Institute of Technology
HL

Hailey Loehde-Woolard

Georgia Institute of Technology
BR

Benjamin Rapsas

Georgia Institute of Technology
LW

Laura Winalski

Georgia Institute of Technology


Wednesday April 13, 2016 9:00am - 9:45am
Room F/G

9:00am

Crossing the Digital Bridge: Digital Librarianship and Graduate Programming, A History
Aaron Wimer, Laura Palmer, Morgan Rhetts

Aaron Wimer, Laura Palmer, Morgan Rhetts This presentation will take a look at the 5 years of the "Embedded Librarian Program" at the former Southern Polytechnic State University. This will include its beginnings, growth, expansion, and transition to the "New U" of consolidation. We will also discuss issues that occurred during planning and implementation, as well as issues that arose later in the process. We also consider the importance of faculty buy-in for digital librarianship and examine the importance of faculty involvement both at the start and throughout the program's development. Finally, we will share our evaluation and analysis of the 5 year program, along with suggestions for starting a Digital Librarian Program at other institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Laura Palmer

Laura Palmer

Department Chair, Digital Writing and Media Arts, Kennesaw State University
MR

Morgan Rhetts

Kennesaw State University
AW

Aaron Wimer

Kennesaw State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 9:00am - 9:45am
Room L

9:00am

Moving Out of the Classroom with Field-Based Student Consulting Projects
Kirk Heriot, John Finley

Kirk Heriot, John Finley The purpose of this session is to describe a unique active learning pedagogy we use. Micro Student Consulting Projects" are an alternative to traditional active learning experiences. In our session, we describe how we take students outside the classroom to complete "consulting" projects for local organizations, both businesses and not-for-profit organizations. We will also describe the process we use to administer our program. Lastly, we will present examples of student projects and address how variations of student consulting projects might be used by faculty in other academic disciplines."

Speakers
JF

John Finley

Columbus State University
KH

Kirk Heriot

Columbus State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 9:00am - 9:45am
Room R

9:00am

National Initiatives Working with OER – ALG Invited Speakers Panel
Mark Jenkins, LWill Cross, Carli Spina, Erin Walker, Lauren Fancher

Affordable Learning Georgia will facilitate this session featuring panelists from across the nation who will discuss the initiatives they have supported working with Open Access and lower cost learning materials. The experiences they represent include use of OER in competency-based courses and programs, management of copyright and open access, commercial textbooks, and supporting higher education systems and institutions initiatives for more affordable learning materials.

Moderators
avatar for Affordable Learning Georgia - OER Conference Track Sponsor

Affordable Learning Georgia - OER Conference Track Sponsor

Director, GALILEO Support Services, BOR-USG
OER, GALILEO, libraries, affordable learning materials, University System's efforts to improve student success through affordable learning materials, questions about Athens, and why OER NOW...

Speakers
avatar for Mark Jenkins

Mark Jenkins

Director, eLearning | Open Education, Washington SBCTC
Always happy to talk about OER initiatives, open policy contexts, technology accessibility and flexible learning delivery, including competency-based approaches.


Wednesday April 13, 2016 9:00am - 9:45am
Room K

9:00am

Showcasing Online Student Presentations
Nicole Lynch

Today's technology engages students by providing a stage for students to deliver presentations and collaborate in the online classroom. This presentation will highlight a variety of online tools including video assignments for students to demonstrate practical skills and give student presentations using video and webinars. The presenter will share examples of student assignments leveraging technologies that not only educate, but also inspire student learning and collaborative problem-solving. Step-by-step instructions will be provided on how students can seamlessly share uploaded media, recorded videos, recorded screenshot videos, and live webinars. These tools encourage rich student-teacher and student-student interaction in the online classroom. This presentation will benefit faculty utilizing online learning platforms for distance, blended, and seated environments.

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Lynch

Nicole Lynch

Perimeter College Georgia State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 9:00am - 9:45am
Room Q

9:00am

Ways to Engage Students in Total Online Courses
Vanessa "Paige" Crump, Lauri Walters

This session will address student engagement in fully online courses where there is no face-to-face instruction between the instructor and students. The presenters, with eight plus years of online development and instruction combined, will explain how the personalization of their online courses has aided their students to maintain engagement in these courses. Some examples include audio and video, discussion questions and posts, and reflections. Two different disciplines will be discussed and examples of these activities and personalization of fully online courses within these disciplines will be addressed.

Speakers
VQ

Vanessa "Paige" Crump

Associate Professor of Spanish, Middle Georgia State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 9:00am - 9:45am
Room V/W

9:00am

What the Tech? Using Digital Tools in the 21st Century Classroom
Rebecca Cooper, Amy Farah, Katharine Page, Ruth Caillouet, Tiffany Coleman, Dawn Souter

Rebecca Cooper, Amy Farah, Dawn Souter, Katharine Page, Tiffany Coleman, Ruth Caillouet This interactive session explores 13 digital tools for use in the classroom by students and teachers at any educational level. These tools can be used to review, assess, present and organize a variety of educational concepts as well as promote collaboration and student engagement through the creation of authentic products. Come see how the Teacher Education faculty at GGC have implemented these tools in order to model best practices for future teachers.

Speakers
RC

Ruth Caillouet

Georgia Gwinnett College
TC

Tiffany Coleman

Georgia Gwinnett College
RC

Rebecca Cooper

Georgia Gwinnett College
AF

Amy Farah

Georgia Gwinnett College
KP

Katharine Page

Georgia Gwinnett College
DS

Dawn Souter

Georgia Gwinnett College


Wednesday April 13, 2016 9:00am - 9:45am
Room T/U

9:45am

Morning Break- Sponsored by University of North Georgia Press & by Software Resources and Services, USG
Thanks to our sponsors for the morning break:

The University of North Georgia Press, University of North Georgia

and 

Software Resources and Services (SRS) of the University System of Georgia 

You will find refreshments at both the Hill Atrium and the Kellogg Concourse. 

Wednesday April 13, 2016 9:45am - 10:15am
Hill Atrium/ Kellogg Concourse

10:00am

Building Relationship Webs in the Classroom (may Boost Student GPAs)
Josh Pfiester

David Brooks stated in a 2011 TED talk that "the fact is, people learn from people they love. And if you're not talking about the individual relationship between a teacher and a student, you're not talking about that reality. But that reality is expunged from our policy-making process." This presentation will discuss research literature, strategies, and lessons learned in building student-instructor relationships in a face-to-face multicultural undergraduate course. Strategies to be discussed include use of the Panorama Education Survey, autobiographical presentations, and a (literal) web-building activity. Relationships promote trust and trust is necessary for risk-taking. The intended audience are all instructors (whether face-to-face, hybrid, or online), but especially those who struggle with building relationships with their students.

Speakers
JP

Josh Pfiester

Dalton State College


Wednesday April 13, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am
Room Y/Z

10:00am

Level Up! Using Badges and Gamification Strategies to Increase Student Engagement in Online and Blended Courses
Neil Rigole

Digital badges are a method of showcasing a learner's earned skills or competencies in education. The idea of utilizing a visual representation of achievement is not new, and utilizing methods of rewarding behavior or achievement, as a means to further motivation, is not an unknown concept in education. Gamification as well, is often seen as a way to motivate people to do something they are not intrinsically motivated to do. This session will focus on the use of the "Awards" tool in the D2L/Brightspace Learning Environment (available in version 10.5) as a gamification strategy in online and blended courses to increase student engagement. Beyond showcasing the badge creation and awarding process, the session will examine student perceptions of the use of badges and gamification in courses currently being taught in the School of Information Technology at Middle Georgia State University.

Speakers
NR

Neil Rigole

Middle Georgia State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am
Room L

10:00am

Making It Real: Putting Life into the Lived Spaces of the Past
Glenda Swan

This session presents some of the approaches and activities used to engage students in the study of domestic architecture as part of an upper-division topics course in Art History on the ancient Roman city of Pompeii. Students were transformed into "Century 1" Real Estate Agent Trainees and, after learning about the ideal Roman house plan, explored the non-ideal residential environments that Pompeians actually occupied. Real houses and archaeological data were used to create oral and written "realtor reports" that emphasized the good - and underplayed the negative - features of actual houses from the region. Students also made proposals to imagined house-builders about the best way to design and decorate houses for irregular and/or small plots of land that I adapted from actual Pompeian homes. Through these activities, students were able to relate the space, decor and social use of these ancient spaces with their own experiences of modern environments.

Speakers
GS

Glenda Swan

Valdosta State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am
Room F/G

10:00am

Making Perfect 10's in Online Discussions: Defining Processes and Assessing Outcomes
Danilo Baylen

This presentation will describe a framework, identified as DECI, used to design online discussions for stronger engagement between students, and with course content and technology. It will discuss how each component of the DECI framework (Demonstrate, Engagement, Contribution, and Insights) supports the flow of an engaging and productive online discussion. Examples of online discussion prompts or scenarios will be shared during the presentation. Also, assessment of student learning within this framework will be addressed. This presentation will be of interest to those who teach online or use online discussions to supplement face-to-face instruction.

Speakers
DB

Danilo Baylen

University of West Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am
Room R

10:00am

Quality, Creation, and Use: OER Experiences in Undergraduate Education Courses
Deanna Cozart, Brian Dotts

This presentation is aimed at faculty, librarians, and higher education staff interested in increasing and promoting the use of OER on campus. This session will highlight the experiences of faculty from the College of Education at UGA who created new OER materials to implement with undergraduate Foundations of Education students. The discussion will include a display of the new materials, challenges encountered during creation, and impacts to instruction and student performance. As concerns over quality of OER are often a barrier for more widespread implementation by faculty, attendees will have an opportunity to participate in an activity for quality review of OER versus traditional textbook content.

Speakers
DC

Deanna Cozart

Coordinator of Open Educational Resources, The University of Georgia
BD

Brian Dotts

Associate Professor, The University of Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am
Room K

10:00am

Reframing Student Engagement: Creating a Supportive Learning Environment and Increasing Active Learning in Face-to-Face, Blended, and Online Courses
Cher Hendricks, Beth Rene' Roepnack

For students to be active, engaged learners, faculty need to create a supportive learning environment that encourages students to engage with course materials, reflect on their learning, and engage with others as they learn new concepts and skills. Whether you are teaching face-to-face, blended, or online, this interactive, hands-on session will provide a number of strategies to encourage students’ active learning with materials, with others, and with their own learning. Following best practices for engaged learning, participants will work collaboratively to develop activities that increase student engagement—beyond in-class and online discussions—that they can implement in their own courses and that are aligned to student learning outcomes. To get the most benefit from this session, participants are encouraged to bring a course syllabus or student learning outcome to share and discuss as we consider ways to help students actively engage in their learning.

Speakers
avatar for Cher Hendricks

Cher Hendricks

University of West Georgia
avatar for BethRene' Roepnack

BethRene' Roepnack

Assoc. Director of Online Faculty Development, University of West Georgia
I think that online discussions, done well, are the heart of any online course. However, I would love to learn about alternatives that maintain a sense of engagement and community while encouraging learning.


Wednesday April 13, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am
Room T/U

10:00am

Underpinning Technology with Theory in the Online Classroom
Renita Luck, Dorea Hardy

We are educators because we are passionate about sharing information and helping others discover the joy of learning. And, while the cognitive processes for learning may not have changed over the years, how we engage those processes most certainly has. The demand for 21st-century skills such as digital literacy, collaboration, and critical thinking mandate that we infuse our lesson plans with technological resources and engage our students in collaborative, interactive environments. Whether or not the thought of using technology in your classroom fills you with excitement or dread, this workshop is for you. By exploring principles of the Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning and freely available Internet resources, this workshop will help guide you in the process of incorporating technology into your existing lesson plans in ways that will engage the student and maximize the use of cognitive processes to enhance active learning. Attendees who desire to interact with the resources highlighted during the workshop are encouraged to bring a laptop.

Speakers
avatar for Dorea Hardy

Dorea Hardy

Web Application Administrator, Darton State College
I am a student at Valdosta State University, pursuing an Ed.D. in Adult and Career Education. I am in my final year of coursework and am looking for resources towards my dissertation, focused on Online Faculty + Technology Acceptance (TAM) + Technology Burnout.
avatar for Renita Luck

Renita Luck

Director, Online Learning, Darton State College
I am passionate about online learning, committed to students - especially the adult learner, and enamored with learning theory especially as it relates to distance education. When I'm not working I enjoy reading, working with Legos, and spending time with my family.


Wednesday April 13, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am
Room V/W

10:00am

Using Dichotomous Meaning Dimensions to Cultivate Students' Critical Thinking Skills
Joseph Mayo

Teaching undergraduate classes presents special challenges. In addition to covering much content in an organized manner, instructors attempt to stimulate critical thinking and student engagement in learning. To accomplish these goals, an innovative and evidence-based pedagogical strategy that I have found effective highlights dichotomous meaning dimensions within the framework of personal construct theory (PCT). Personal constructs are hierarchically linked sets of bipolar meaning dimensions (e.g., central-peripheral) that each person uses to interpret knowledge. Based on my own previously published reports in which I systematically validate the pedagogical efficacy of applying PCT, I will summarize my instructional methodologies and findings in teaching life-span development and the history of psychology. I will conclude by discussing implications of using PCT as a heuristic and assessment tool in interdisciplinary and other undergraduate classes outside of the psychology discipline.

Speakers
JM

Joseph Mayo

Gordon State College


Wednesday April 13, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am
Room Q

11:00am

5 Weird Disruptions Already Changing Your Future
Myk Garn

If you think you know where change is coming from -- think again. Or better yet -- start running! These disruptions are not just distributed -- they can be disturbing. Find out what 60 experts from across the USG think the future will look like in 2030. From CBE to CRM and LRM for your SIS and students PLEs -- find out what you need to be doing to prepare for the future. This session will help you identify, evaluate and work with the trends and emergent developments that are nudging us today -- and could be driving us tomorrow.

Speakers
MG

Myk Garn

Board of Regents - System Office


Wednesday April 13, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room R

11:00am

ALG Grantees Panel: What We Did, What We Learned, and What We Would Do Differently: Affordability with OER’s in Action
ALG Panel Presentation

In this panel presentation Affordable Learning Georgia Grantees will discuss the following three projects and share their experiences in developing and using open and low cost textbooks and materials.

 

OERs, GA View, and Small Groups: Engaged Hybrid Learning in Theatre 1100

Deborah Liss-Green, Caryl Nemajovsky

It's a given that Open Education Resources (OER) save students money, but they can also be used in introductory arts courses to promote student engagement, challenge their capacity for critical analysis, and allow for differentiated instruction. When included in an organized and accessible LibGuide and GA View support page, OERs are a cost efficient, readily adaptable, and genuinely exciting alternative to the traditional (and expensive) publisher's textbook and E-pack. This presentation will share the use of a variety of OER along with hybrid learning activities in THEA 1100.

 

Open Educational Resources Through a Social Justice Lens

Lauren Johnson, Kelly McFaden, Sheri Hardee, Deanna Cozart

Social justice, the idea all people should be treated with fairness, respect, dignity, and generosity regardless of their background and identity (Nieto & Bode, 2012), is often conceptualized in education from the content perspective or the action perspective (Brown & Kraehe, 2010; Swain, 2013). This presentation for tertiary level educators describes our work to incorporate social justice education into teacher preparation through the use of open-access online resources. Through our work with Affordable Learning Georgia, we lay the groundwork for approaching social justice education through both content and action for Social Foundations of Education courses. The open access materials we utilize can be taken and adapted by any institution.

 

You Had Me at Free: Creating an E-Textbook from Open Source Materials to Motivate, Engage and Inspire Today's Learners

Susan Willey, Emerson Stewart, Zoe Salloom

Today’s students prefer “chunks” of information presented in a variety of formats, instead of reading traditional, and often expensive, textbooks. In response to the learning styles and preferences of these millennial students, we created a free e-textbook for undergraduate legal environment of business students that uses more than 250 open source videos, multi-media materials, readings, websites, and author-created content and exercises. After we describe how we selected content and designed the book to allow students to personalize their learning experiences, we’ll share data on student website usage and performance, as well as their comments. Finally, we’ll address how we ensure that the e-book is ADA-compliant, current, doesn’t violate copyrights, and other technical issues for those who want to create their own OER-based teaching materials.

Moderators
avatar for Jeff Gallant

Jeff Gallant

ALG Visiting Program Officer for OER, University System of Georgia

Speakers
DC

Deanna Cozart

Coordinator of Open Educational Resources, The University of Georgia
SH

Sheri Hardee

University of North Georgia
avatar for Deborah Liss-Green

Deborah Liss-Green

Assistant Professor, Darton State College
Deborah Liss-Green teaches and directs at Darton State College in Albany, GA. She is a two-time recipient of the Meritorious Achievement Award for Directing from Region 4 of the American College Theatre Festival. She can be reached at deborah.lissgreen@darton.edu.
KM

Kelly McFaden

University of North Georgia
CN

Caryl Nemajovsky

Darton State College
avatar for Zoe Salloom

Zoe Salloom

Instructional Designer, Georgia State University
ES

Emerson Stewart

GSU Student
Majoring in Film with a minor in Risk Management & Insurance.
SW

Susan Willey

Georgia State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room K

11:00am

Curriculum Design Academy: Fostering Student Success through Guided Curricular Innovation
Robert Bledsoe, Deborah Richardson, Gina Hammock, Eric Zuckerman, Adam Wyatt

This panel describes a Complete College Georgia initiative that helps academic programs engage in curricular changes and faculty development aimed at improving student success. In the Curriculum Design Academy, teams from designated programs review the principles of learning and work through the principles of course design. Programs subsequently submit proposals for curriculum change that are eligible for internal grant support. Courses targeted by the first cohort experienced an average 10 point decrease in percentage of students receiving a D, F or W. Presenters will describe the program, present evidence of its effectiveness, and feature projects from Chemistry and the Psychological Sciences. The session should appeal to administrators of CCG initiatives, faculty developers, and individuals engaged or interested in course- or program-level curricular innovation.

Speakers
RB

Robert Bledsoe

Augusta University
GH

Gina Hammock

Augusta University
DR

Deborah Richardson

Director of Faculty Development, Augusta University
avatar for Adam TM Wyatt

Adam TM Wyatt

Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs and Student Success, Augusta University
EZ

Eric Zuckerman

Augusta University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room Y/Z

11:00am

Medium Matters: Faculty and Student Reflections on How the Delivery Channel Impacts Student Engagement and Academic Success
Meredith Ginn, Sarah Johnson, Karen Huggin

Three faculty members from two USG institutions will discuss their experiences teaching the same course using different mediums, including a comparison of online, hybrid and face-to-face delivery formats. The presentation is intended for faculty members teaching both lower and upper-level undergraduate courses in a variety of disciplines. Student success and course evaluation data along with student video testimonials will be shared as a starting point for reflection and discussion among participants. Pros and cons of course delivery formats will be debated, and strategies for improving distance education will be shared.

Speakers
MG

Meredith Ginn

Georgia Highlands College
KH

Karen Huggin

Georgia Highlands College
avatar for Sarah Johnson

Sarah Johnson

Lecturer, School of Communication & Media, Kennesaw State University
I worked in nonprofit public relations for six years where I created campaigns, marketing plans and graphic design pieces for the following industries: healthcare, community outreach and higher education. Five years ago, I transitioned my career toward teaching so that I could share essential graphic design skills with the next generation of PR practitioners. I currently teach graphic communication and writing courses to public relations students... Read More →


Wednesday April 13, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room L

11:00am

Online Science Courses Without Sacrificing the 'Hands-On' Component
Stephanie Songer

Science education has been challenged by the rapid growth of online instruction. Using lab kits as part of a hands-on approach to online science avoids the sacrifice of student engagement. We will explore ideas to adopt and adapt a hands-on, inquiry model for online science labs that achieve essential lab skills and learning outcomes. Participants will actively take part in hands-on lab investigations developed for online science courses. These investigations have been designed for the off-campus setting while maintaining the college-level rigor.

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Songer

Stephanie Songer

Distance Learning Specialist, Carolina Biological Supply Company
As a Distance Learning Specialist, I develop and manage kits that enable online college students to carry out hands-on laboratory science investigations at home. Prior to joining Carolina Biological Supply Company, I taught university-level biology courses for over 15 years.


Wednesday April 13, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room V/W

11:00am

Opening the Classroom Door: A Hands-On Approach to Study Abroad Programs
Elissa Auerbach, Stephen Auerbach, Craig Pascoe

This session features two innovative study abroad programs that utilize a blended learning experience which promotes critical thinking skills. These programs emphasize hands-on learning opportunities only possible through study abroad while providing the equivalent content knowledge students encounter in an online course. The first is an interdisciplinary program in Amsterdam and Paris examining the art history and history of the Netherlands and France from early modernity to the present; the second in Florence and Tuscany explores Italian foodways and culture. The audience will engage with a former student about her project on a major funerary monument in Delft that culminated in a scholarly research paper. The audience will also participate in an olive oil tasting that illuminates an Italian community's history and culture. Although the programs are focused primarily on art, history, and culture the model can easily be implemented in other disciplines.

Speakers
avatar for Elissa Auerbach

Elissa Auerbach

Associate Professor, Department of Art, Georgia College
Associate Professor of art history with a specialization in seventeenth-century Dutch and Flemish art. I teach courses in Renaissance and Baroque art history, introductory art history, Art and Ideas, and Writing about Art. I also direct a summer study abroad program in Amsterdam and Paris.
SA

Stephen Auerbach

Georgia College & State University
CP

Craig Pascoe

Georgia College & State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room Q

11:00am

Promoting Student Engagement Through the Use of Animated PowerPoint Presentations
Sheryne Southard

This presentation addresses an issue many online instructors encounter: how to more effectively engage the online student in the instructional material? The presenter will demonstrate strategies for developing animated PowerPoint presentations with audio to accomplish this goal. It outlines strategies for transforming material that can be perceived as mundane into engaging presentations. Free or inexpensive tools for creating animated presentations to enhance online informational and instructional materials will be reviewed. Specific examples will be included for orientation materials, instructional content and student assignments. Participants attending this session will receive instruction on how to create these materials and how to teach students to create them to produce PowerPoint presentations. The intended audience is anyone that seeks to improve student engagement in the learning process, as these resources can be applied in an online, hybrid or traditional classroom environment.

Speakers
SS

Sheryne Southard

Clayton State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room T/U

11:00am

Solving Two Common eLearning Problems: Student Retention & Proctoring Process Management
Tara McLaughlin

Boosting student retention and providing a robust testing environment are two challenges facing eLearning leaders. In this presentation a review of literature will reveal that students often drop out due to non-cognitive factors such as procrastination, time management, and technology skills. The SmarterMeasure Learning Readiness Indicator is the leading assessment of non-cognitive skills. Score reports from the assessment map the student's scores to resources for support. Testing integrity and learner authentication continue to be challenges. SmarterProctoring is the first Proctoring Process Management System, which allows schools to provide multiple proctoring modalities such as testing centers, human proctors, and virtual proctors. Through dashboards embedded into the LMS faculty, students, administrators and proctors can all track the full proctoring process for multiple modaliaties in real time for each student.

Speakers
avatar for Tara McLaughlin

Tara McLaughlin

National Account Manager, SmarterServices
SmarterMeasure account manager for over 8 years. Work with over 200 schools across the country to assist in getting SmarterMeasure off the ground and running. Love helping schools and their students meet their success goals.


Wednesday April 13, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room F/G

12:00pm

Lunch - Sponsored by Affordable Learning Georgia
Welcome Remarks - Dr. Ginger Durham, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, University System of Georgia

Thank you to Affordable Learning Georgia for sponsoring lunch on Wednesday! 

Wednesday April 13, 2016 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Magnolia Ballroom

1:15pm

Interactive Keynote and Workshop - Dr. Alison Morrison-Shetlar
Dr. Alison Morrison-Shetlar

Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Interim Vice Chancellor of Development and Alumni Affairs at Western Carolina University

How and what do students learn through intentional learning? How does student research, faculty scholarship, leadership development, study abroad, internships, service learning, capstone courses etc., help our students learn? How do we know they are learning and what is the short and long term effects of intentional learning? In this workshop we will discuss and share ideas on intentional learning pedagogies that work!

Wednesday April 13, 2016 1:15pm - 2:45pm
Mahler Hall

2:45pm

3:00pm

Adaptive Learning: The Possibilities of Doing More with Open
Sarah Mergel, Tammy Byron, Matt Haldeman

OERs are a great way to lower the costs of a college education for twenty-first century students, but are they enough to engage students in the material and promote learning? In this presentation, participants in a pilot at Dalton State College share how they have created an adaptive learning tool with an OER solution and will present on their experience (so far). The team will discuss the science behind adaptive learning, the process of authoring the learning objectives and probes, the potential benefits to students and faculty, how it is setting up the OER materials for future revisions and finally, the initial reaction of students using the adaptive product.

Speakers
TB

Tammy Byron

Dalton State College
MH

Matt Haldeman

McGraw-Hill Higher Education
SM

Sarah Mergel

Dalton State College


Wednesday April 13, 2016 3:00pm - 3:45pm
Room L

3:00pm

CANCELLED - Finding New Perspectives: The Transformative Power of Service-Learning in Higher Education
Maya Clark

Universities seek to provide graduates transformative learning experiences to facilitate both lifelong learning and the acquisition of career-related knowledge. This presentation will describe the use of service learning as a transformative learning tool which integrates discipline specific learning objectives, practical experience, and structured opportunities for students to think critically. Reflective student writings and surveys associated with a service learning experience designed to promote literacy development in economically disadvantaged communities will be discussed. Results suggest service learning provided an opportunity for students to think critically while engaged in team-oriented experiences, widen cultural perspectives, and value community involvement. This presentation is intended for individuals interested in promoting active learning, cultural competence, and civic responsibility within the university curriculum.

Speakers
MC

Maya Clark

Armstrong State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 3:00pm - 3:45pm
Room V/W

3:00pm

Community Health Issues: A Model for Collaborative Performative Engagement
Karen Berman, Kristi Papailler

Utilizing local spaces in the community and community member interaction, students in Georgia College Theatre for Social Change classes and their partners in Early College, a program for at-risk teens, collaborate in active student engagement on health issues to create best practices for promoting engaged student learning. From performances at museums on the topic of race and education such as the Sallie Ellis Davis House, where an early 1900s African-American teacher began a local school, to out-of-doors performances at the Clothesline Project to advocate against violence against women, a diverse group of students engage members of the community to participate in solving social issues. The students themselves will demonstrate the product of this unique scholarship of teaching and learning method. Portfolio assessments of critical thinking are explored.This program will be helpful for students in and professors in all disciplines interested in community interactive engagement.

Speakers
KB

Karen Berman

Georgia College
KP

Kristi Papailler

Georgia College & State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 3:00pm - 3:45pm
Room F/G

3:00pm

Contribute a Verse: Adopting OER for First-Year Composition
Diana Edelman-Young, Tanya Bennett, Donna Gessell

This interactive workshop will present a newly available open-access resource for teaching composition: Contribute A Verse: A Guide to First-Year Composition. Written collaboratively by eleven experienced professors at the University of North Georgia, this text presents best practices for teaching college-level writing. An open educational resource, this text was recently leased by the Board of Regents and is freely available via Galileo and can be printed on-demand. The text integrates the principles of classical rhetoric with practical exercises in a tone that readily connects with college students. The text also includes a section on writing in the physical and social sciences and a reader with themes for writing, features that demonstrate the diverse, interdisciplinary nature of the text. From planning to publication, Contribute a Verse also offers a model for how departments in other disciplines and institutions can collaborate to create their own materials.

Speakers
avatar for Tanya Bennett

Tanya Bennett

Interim Dean of Honors, University of North Georgia
DE

Diana Edelman-Young

University of North Georgia
DG

Donna Gessell

University of North Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 3:00pm - 3:45pm
Room K

3:00pm

Experiencing Undergraduate Student Research: Active Collaboration and Engagement
Danilo Baylen, Kendal Lucas, Runeshia Parker

This panel presentation focuses on the successful experience of undergraduate students as participants in a research and mentoring project. The faculty facilitator will describe the design and management of the experience including initial challenges. The student panelists will discuss their profiles (knowledge and skills sets), individual projects and outcomes (presentations and publications), and insights in becoming researchers, critical thinkers, and active and engaged collaborators. They will also share stories about personal growth and decision-making towards potential professional career paths. This session will benefit those interested in mentoring undergraduate students in co-producing scholarly works and will provide opportunities for the audience to share their own experiences in working with undergraduate students as well as viewpoints in socializing them to the research process.

Speakers
DB

Danilo Baylen

University of West Georgia
KL

Kendal Lucas

University of West Georgia
RP

Runeshia Parker

University of West Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 3:00pm - 3:45pm
Room R

3:00pm

Innovative Advising Practices: How to Transform Your Institution Through Pro-Active Advising
Dustin Worsley, Stephanie Lahnala

Pro-active Academic Advising has contributed to the increase of retention and progression of students at Columbus State University (CSU). The Academic Center for Excellence (ACE) and Preceptorship Advising and Clinical Experience (PACE) advising centers at CSU are leading efforts with regards to pro-active advising. Best practices in pro-active advising by professional staff advisors at CSU includes using technology to pro-actively identify at-risk students and provide timely interventions, five intentional contacts with advisees per semester, participation in the "15 to Finish" initiative, and supporting students holistically. Join representatives from ACE and PACE as they present proven strategies that utilize technology and innovative advising practices that have positively impacted Complete College Georgia (CCG) and transformed the culture of advising at CSU. Discussion will include how you can incorporate these practices at your home institution.

Speakers
SL

Stephanie Lahnala

Columbus State University
DW

Dustin Worsley

Columbus State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 3:00pm - 3:45pm
Room Y/Z

3:00pm

Use of Open Source Software for Teaching Digital Media Content Creation Skills at Georgia Gwinnett College
Kairui Chen, Shuhua Lai

Digital Media is a general education course at Georgia Gwinnett College in which students learn about different types of media in sound, graphics, video and animations and their digitization processes. Students are required to use various software to create and manipulate digital documents of those media types. In this session I will present how open source software such as GIMP, Audacity, Inkscape and Blender and some free software are used for teaching digital media production and editing skills and how hands on activities are designed and used to effectively engage students in this course.

Speakers
KC

Kairui Chen

Georgia Gwinnett College


Wednesday April 13, 2016 3:00pm - 3:45pm
Room Q

3:00pm

YouTube University: Fostering Intellectual Curiosity and Critical Thinking with Online Media
Natalie James

Online multimedia texts such as YouTube videos, TED talks, and Podcasts are not only free and engaging for students, they can also model "popular intellectualism," curiosity, cultural criticism, and information literacy. This presentation demonstrates how to effectively use online multimedia to model critical engagement in a variety of disciplines.

Speakers
avatar for Natalie James

Natalie James

Lecturer, Georgia Southern University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 3:00pm - 3:45pm
Room T/U

4:00pm

College on the Move: Hands on Learning
Niels Eichhorn

This presentation is based on my experiences with an experimental summer travel course in which students were on the road for 16 days and visited a series of historical locations in Georgia, Tennessee, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Alabama. The presentation will show the importance of hands on learning. Students gained a better appreciation for the topography of battlefield in the outcome of fights, why battles were fought in certain places, and how southern plantations worked during the antebellum years. Even more, students learned about new job opportunities within museums, historic sites, and with the National Park Service. While a long 16-day trip might be beyond the capacity of many students and professors, classes can engage in small daylong fieldtrips to gain at least a basic appreciation and provide knowledge impossible to convey in a conventional classroom.

Speakers
NE

Niels Eichhorn

Middle Georgia State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 4:00pm - 4:45pm
Room R

4:00pm

Critical Thinking and Social Coding: Killing Two Birds with One Stone
Laura Hanna

This presentation stems from a frustration with students' decreasing ability to heed social cues in professional settings (such as standing up and shaking the mayor's hand when he walks into the room) and an attempt to help students remedy that lack through exercises in critical thinking and role playing in the classroom. Using Louis Althusser's theories about the social constructions of meaning and behavior (including ideological state apparatuses) to undergird the theoretical aspects of the presentation, I argue for the importance of teaching students how to respond to different social situations and how to connect this lesson back to understanding the importance of making meaning from social contexts, which ultimately strengthens students' critical thinking skills and propensity for success in the real world. This presentation provides attendees with some concrete ideas for classroom discussions and scenarios for successful interactions that can be implemented in any classroom.

Speakers
avatar for Laura Hanna

Laura Hanna

Valdosta State University
Laura Hanna advises honors students at Valdosta State University's Honors College and is earning a doctorate in education at the same institution. She also teaches English at Wiregrass Georgia Technical College. Laura's previous degrees are in English literature; she holds an MA in English from Auburn University. Laura's primary research and teaching interests include curriculum and instruction; contemporary poetry and poetry writing; post-Civil... Read More →


Wednesday April 13, 2016 4:00pm - 4:45pm
Room L

4:00pm

Engaged Student Learning through Course-Based Experiences: Identifying Impact
Kyle Frantz, Cheri Kersey

xperiential learning is a classic approach to student engagement, based in experience, reflection, and application. At Georgia State University, over 350 'signature experience' courses offer experiential learning in formats such as field studies, internships, clinical rotations, student teaching, and service learning. Identifying the impact of experiential learning across an institution is a challenge, one that requires a multifaceted approach. For example, institutional research can test for contributions to academic trajectories or correlation with student competencies. Surveys can quantify student assessment of their own learning. Individual interviews can describe the experiences and effects. Outcomes at Georgia State confirm that students identify gains in critical thinking, communication, networking, and career goals. Based on impact analysis, developing value propositions for students, faculty, and staff may be critical to enhancing course-based experiential learning.

Speakers
KF

Kyle Frantz

Georgia State University
CK

Cheri Kersey

Georgia State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 4:00pm - 4:45pm
Room F/G

4:00pm

Student Well-Being Matters: Towards a Balanced Interactive Model of Teaching and Learning Process
Barbara Karwacinski

Positive psychological functioning in a social context is an important factor for students' academic and personal success. There are two main theoretical perspectives, which focus on addressing the questions of what makes people feel good and happy. Hedonic well-being is based on the notion that increased pleasure and decreased pain lead to happiness. Eudaimonic well-being, on the other hand, is based on the premise that people feel happy if they experience life purpose, challenges, and growth. From this perspective, by engaging students in eudaimonic pursuits, subjective well-being will occur as a by product of the development of individual strengths and virtues. Seventy-four undergraduate sociology students at Southwestern Michigan College learn and apply principles of eudaimonic well- being during the Spring Semester of 2016. Samples of students' work will be presented and discussed.

Speakers
BK

Barbara Karwacinski

Southwestern Michigan College


Wednesday April 13, 2016 4:00pm - 4:45pm
Room Q

4:00pm

The Mission: Help Military and Veteran Students Succeed in College
Mark Eister

Veterans arguably represent one of the most complex and diverse populations on campus. This session will present the current situation and trends surrounding student veterans. You will be presented with examples of proven strategies, practices, and policies that promote successful transition of veterans to postsecondary education, including training developed specifically for campus faculty and staff who interact with them. You will hear from a student veteran who has experienced the challenges of transitioning from military life to college and civilian life and how they were able to overcome those challenge and succeed academically. Finally, you will have the opportunity to ask the presenter and the student pointed questions to better understand how you might be able to improve the learning success and overall outcomes of student veterans on your campus.

Speakers
ME

Mark Eister

Georgia Perimeter College


Wednesday April 13, 2016 4:00pm - 4:45pm
Room Y/Z

4:00pm

Using Kahoot! for Student Learning and Engagement in the Classroom
Abby Noble, Cassie Daniel, Hope Wheeler

This presentation explores the classroom use of Kahoot!, a free, web-based app for creating interactive quizzes. Kahoot! can enhance the learning environment by reinforcing content knowledge while encouraging student involvement and engagement. (It's also a lot of fun!) We will discuss the technical aspects of Kahoot!, including how to create one and facilitate it, as well as best practices from our experiences using it in math courses. Participants are encouraged to bring a tablet or mobile device to the presentation.

Speakers
CD

Cassie Daniel

Middle Georgia State University
AN

Abby Noble

Middle Georgia State University
HW

Hope Wheeler

Middle Georgia State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 4:00pm - 4:45pm
Room T/U

4:00pm

Worst Online Discussion Practices (and their remedies)
Beth Rene' Roepnack

Online discussions are ideal places for engaging students with content, peers, and the instructor, but they can be onerous for students and faculty. While they offer the opportunity for deep social and cognitive engagement if students are prompted by thoughtful opening questions and effective follow-up questions and scaffolding techniques, they can be time intensive. We will consider various worst practices and then explore tools and techniques for remedying these practices and reducing the (often) cumbersome nature of online discussions. Then we will briefly review foundational work on cognitive and social engagement. Participants will work in small groups to apply tools learned and to develop a question set for their own classes (initial questions, follow-up, scaffolding). Finally, we will look at how we can follow Heidegger’s dictum to ‘let students learn’ while maintaining an online presence. Bring a course objective for discussion development.

Speakers
avatar for BethRene' Roepnack

BethRene' Roepnack

Assoc. Director of Online Faculty Development, University of West Georgia
I think that online discussions, done well, are the heart of any online course. However, I would love to learn about alternatives that maintain a sense of engagement and community while encouraging learning.


Wednesday April 13, 2016 4:00pm - 4:45pm
Room V/W

4:00pm

Development and Implementation of an Open Educational Resource for Introductory Chemistry
Wednesday Afternoon OER Pecha Kucha Session
Presentation 2

Greta Giles, Jim Konzelman


In response to the growing need for affordable course materials in introductory college chemistry courses an open access chemistry text was piloted in 2 sections of Introductory Chemistry (Chem 1211 and 1212) at the University of North Georgia. The open access text selected was the Chemistry text published by the Openstax project at Rice University. A course website was developed to accompany the text which included text excerpts, short narrated powerpoint lectures, and practice problems. Student performance was evaluated at the end of the semester using standardized exams. Attitudinal surveys were also collected from students as a form of evaluation.

Speakers
GG

Greta Giles

University of North Georgia
JK

Jim Konzelman

University of North Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 4:00pm - 4:45pm
Room K

4:00pm

Implementing an Open Educational Resource in Human Growth and Development
Wednesday Afternoon OER Pecha Kucha Session
Presentation 1

Ellen Cotter, Gary Fisk, Judy Orton Grissett


This presentation describes the implementation of an Open Educational Resource (OER) in PSYC 2103 (Human Growth and Development). A chapter from an existing open textbook will be supplemented with writing and discussion assignments, outside reading, and multimedia activities. As this OER will be used for the first time during the Spring 2016 semester and the class will still be in progress at the time of the conference, this presentation focuses primarily on preparing and compiling resources as opposed to evaluating the OER's effectiveness. Topics include selecting an OER, using Python programming to develop a test bank, finding resources to supplement OER content, and assessing student perceptions of the OER. The intended audience is not only PSYC 2103 instructors but also faculty who want to use an OER but are apprehensive at not having a full textbook available for this purpose.

Speakers
EC

Ellen Cotter

Georgia Southwestern State University
GF

Gary Fisk

Georgia Southwestern State University
avatar for Judy Grissett

Judy Grissett

Assistant Professor, Georgia Southwestern State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 4:00pm - 4:45pm
Room K

4:00pm

Standard Textbooks to Open Educational Resources: Strategies to Transform Your Class and Promote Student Engagement
Wednesday Afternoon OER Pecha Kucha Session
Presentation 3

Jocelyn Steward, Ethel Callen, Kendolyn Smith


Transforming a class by eliminating textbooks and using open educational resources can be a daunting task. While there are many resources available, navigating through the information may prove difficult and may deter those who wish to use open educational resources in place of textbooks. The presentation will demonstrate a way to transform five undergraduate and graduate courses in a health care management program from using standard textbooks to open educational resources. This presentation will provide a demonstration on how the team completed the transformation including developing modules, appropriate learning objectives, finding course material, and developing interactive material to promote student engagement. Participants will leave the presentation with tools and strategies to use when transforming their own classes. The team received a grant from ALG to complete the transformation.

Speakers
EC

Ethel Callen

Clayton State University
KS

Kendolyn Smith

Clayton State University
avatar for Jocelyn Steward

Jocelyn Steward

Clayton State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 4:00pm - 4:45pm
Room K

4:00pm

Use of Chemwiki and Khan Academy for Survey of Organic and Biochemistry
Wednesday Afternoon OER Pecha Kucha Session
Presentation 4

Jonathan G. Cannon, Renat Khatmullin


This presentation addresses practical experience with the implementation of open educational resources in a high demand, service course. No open textbook yet exists for a one semester survey of Organic and Biochemistry. Chemwiki and Khan Academy provide quality, open educational resources organized around short, narrowly defined topics, which we used to replace an expensive textbook. A majority of the students appreciated the cost savings and used the materials provided regularly, however, we and the students identified small difficulties. in this talk we outline plans to address those difficulties.

Speakers
JG

Jonathan G. Cannon

Middle Georgia State University
RK

Renat Khatmullin

Middle Georgia State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 4:00pm - 4:45pm
Room K

4:00pm

Using Freely Available Texts in a Literature Classroom
Wednesday Afternoon OER Pecha Kucha Session
Presentation 5

Rhonda Armstrong, Melissa Johnson


There have been many studies analyzing students' use of electronic texts, with mixed results. Some experts believe that students prefer electronic texts and perform better with such; others state that there is not enough deep comprehension of the materials available online to benefit students and that print format is best. However, most of the studies on the use of electronic texts are related to courses other than those that are literature-based. The recent trend to move into the electronic domain has not yet been fully adopted in the literature classroom. The presenters are conducting a study to see how students engage with digital text in an American Literature survey course. In this presentation, they will discuss the particular challenges and opportunities associated with using freely accessible electronic texts in literary studies, along with preliminary impressions from their study of student attitudes toward and engagement with those texts.

Speakers
RA

Rhonda Armstrong

Augusta University
avatar for Melissa E. Johnson

Melissa E. Johnson

Electronic Resources and Serials Librarian, Augusta University
Melissa Johnson is the Electronic Resources and Serials Librarian at the Summerville Campus of Augusta University. She is the liaison librarian to the Departments of English and Foreign Languages, Chemistry, Biological Sciences, and Mathematics. She is active in NASIG, ALA, GLA, SELA, and the CSRA-LA. She earned her B.A. in English from Augusta State University and her MLIS from Valdosta State University. She is currently working on a MA in... Read More →


Wednesday April 13, 2016 4:00pm - 4:45pm
Room K

5:00pm

P01-Non-Tenure-Track STEM Faculty: Support and Rewards Systems
Dabney Dixon

For many academic institutions in the United States, the faculty model is increasingly differentiated, with different faculty members having different responsibilities and time commitments. Ehrenberg reports that non-tenure-track (NTT) faculty increased between 1995 and 2007 from 24% to 35% at public doctoral institutions and from 18% to 46% at private non-profit doctoral institutions (Ehrenberg, J. Econ. Perspect., 2012, 193-206). For many institutions, supporting NTT STEM Faculty is key to institutional success. We outline some of the current national data on NTT performance in the classroom. We also look at structural ways to provide resources to enhance NTT faculty personal development, professional advancement, research productivity, mentoring skills, and opportunities for innovation.

Speakers
DD

Dabney Dixon

Georgia State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 1

5:00pm

P02-You Want Me to Do What?? Strategies For Addressing Resistance in the Flipped Classroom
Michelle Dykes, Joy Humphrey

As knowledge becomes more abundant than the time allowed to teach it, new strategies must be incorporated into higher education. In the past few years the term "flipped" has become a very popular word in higher education. As a result, there is no shortage of ideas and opinions about flipped learning environments. While many faculty and students have embraced this concept, others have met this new approach with various levels of resistance. This presentation will address various reasons for faculty and student resistance to the flipped classroom method as well as strategies for addressing this resistance.

Speakers
avatar for Michelle Dykes

Michelle Dykes

Georgia Southwestern State University
JH

Joy Humphrey

Georgia Southwestern State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 2

5:00pm

P03-Using Strategic Partnerships to Maximize Critical Thinking and Creating Collaborations
Joy Humphrey, Michelle Dykes

Because of limited budgets and faculty shortage, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) has recommended the use of strategic partnerships between hospitals and nursing schools. These partnerships offer opportunities to create a highly educated nursing workforce, bridge the faculty shortage gap, and strengthen clinical connections with area healthcare agencies. This presentation will discuss a recently initiated strategic partnership aimed at educating senior nursing students in hands-on advanced cardiac life support (ACLS). A one-day, clinical simulation, facilitated by healthcare agency nurse educators, ACLS instructors, and nursing faculty, is provided to allow students a hands-on experience with witnessing, running, and participating in a code blue situation. Future plans for this collaboration, including facilitating continuing education of healthcare agency employees, will also be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Michelle Dykes

Michelle Dykes

Georgia Southwestern State University
JH

Joy Humphrey

Georgia Southwestern State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 3

5:00pm

P04-Assessing Student Preparedness for Writing in the Sciences: A Case Study from a Joint Undergraduate/Graduate Ecology Course
Kaitlin Farrell

Instructors expect that by the time students enroll in 4000/6000 level science courses, they will have experience in scientific writing. As a result, assignments in upper-level science courses may focus on high-stakes written products without determining whether students have the skills needed to successfully complete the assignments. We studied students enrolled in a 4000/6000 level Ecology course to assess the skills that students have upon entering the class (i.e., previously learned skills), the effectiveness of low-stakes course activities in increasing student preparedness for and success in completing summative assignments, and student perceptions of the effectiveness of course activities in preparing them for success on assignments. Understanding how prior student learning experiences do or do not match instructor perceptions of student preparedness for different types of assignments will help maximize student engagement and success in writing in higher-level science courses.

Speakers
KF

Kaitlin Farrell

University of Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 4

5:00pm

P05-Mark Twain and his 'Fable' on Critical Reading
Jason Horn

Showing how a dramatic reading can work to engage students in both reading and writing in composition classes, this presentation offers a review of a course focused on a short tale of Mark Twain's: "A Fable." While dramatically reading Twain's tale about stubborn and argumentative animals, students actively participate in debate as they defend their given animal roles and analyze and evaluate the viewpoints of other characters. This active reading prepares students to analyze and evaluate further readings and their own compositions.

Speakers
JH

Jason Horn

Gordon State College


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 5

5:00pm

P06-Evaluating Honors Program Requirements in Response to Student Needs and Preferences
Matthew Horton, Katherine Kipp

This poster will present findings from surveys administered to Honors Program students enrolled at a two-year, access-oriented, commuter campus of a larger university in order to measure their perceptions of course delivery and program requirements. The presenters developed these surveys in response to low program retention and student frustrations related to time commitment. Based on the data, pathways are suggested for helping these students maximize the academic benefits of Honors Program participation, especially the importance of undergraduate research initiatives that foster critical thinking skills. Attendees will be encouraged to exchange ideas about Honors curriculum, undergraduate research support and scaffolding, and building campus community around academic excellence. Despite its emphasis on Honors Program administration, this poster will be helpful to any faculty or staff looking for strategies that enhance student learning at a variety of institution types.

Speakers
MH

Matthew Horton

University of North Georgia
KK

Katherine Kipp

University of North Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 6

5:00pm

P07-Taking Pre-calculus Class In A Community College Can Be More Cost Effective
Wanjun Hu, Li Feng

From the student's perspective, pre-calculus classes are hard for three reasons: (1) there are so many scattered math concepts and calculations, (2) the professors are not teaching in the students' comfortable way, (3) the textbook is expensive but not helpful. Taking students' concerns into consideration, we provide a pamphlet of about 16 topics. For each topic, we define the algebraic form (what one can write down in Mathematics). Then, we explain its geometric meaning (what one can see). Finally, we list some types of problems and ways to solve them. To facilitate students' learning, we provide a copy of free textbook chapter from OpenStax, and a sample test, so that students can prepare for tests and exams with targets. For a comparison, two sections are taught with one using this new strategy and one using traditional way. Our results show that no significant difference between them in terms of students' performance.

Speakers
LF

Li Feng

Albany State University
WH

Wanjun Hu

Albany State University
Albany State University | Contributed Paper-Faculty | Technology | How much does touch screen technology help under-prepared students in science and math classes? | Teaching mathematics and sciences using touch screen technology has been introduced to many classrooms. However, our study shows that there is no significant difference between using TI calculator and iPad when teaching College Algebra to under-prepared students, and students show... Read More →


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 7

5:00pm

P08-Faculty Perceptions of INQR 1000 Student Learning: Are They Engaged or Just Flirting?
Elizabeth Huggins

INQR 1000 is a discussion-based course designed to encourage first and second year students to use active learning and critical inquiry to create questions about a particular topic of interest and present their findings in an academic EXPO. Over 1000 undergraduate students have reported their success in developing the INQR 1000 skills which include: asking relevant questions; collecting appropriate resources; engaging in positive and meaningful discussions; contributing effectively to a group. We recently asked INQR faculty how they perceived students' development in terms of the learning outcomes. What resulted was surprising. This presentation would be ideal for audiences interested in student-directed learning, and the impact of faculty-student interaction for achieving learning outcomes. It would also be relevant for professionals interested in developing a topic-driven critical thinking course for undergraduate students.

Speakers
EH

Elizabeth Huggins

Director of First & Second Year Experiences, Augusta University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 8

5:00pm

P09-Effect of Nanoparticles on Brine Shrimps - A Course Embedded Model to Integrate Research Based Projects into the Science Curriculum
ByungHoon Kim, Anta'Sha Jones, Louise Wrensford

Many institutions incorporate research activities into the undergraduate curriculum with known positive outcomes. We developed a way to incorporate a series of research projects with a common theme in various science courses that are vertically aligned. Through courses from freshmen to senior years, students are exposed to specially designed research projects related to nanotechnology. Here, we report a remodeling of a General Biology Lab course for Biology majors. In contrast to traditional lab activities, our course material includes a four-week research project, Effect of Nanoparticles on Brine Shrimps. Through this inquiry-based project, students design, execute and analyze data in an experiment to test the toxicity of silver nanoparticles using brine shrimps. We discuss the improvement of students learning outcome and their behavioral change toward science. Intended audience is high school and college level science educators. Supported by NSF Targeted Infusion Grant #HRD-1436265

Speakers
AJ

Anta'Sha Jones

Albany State University
BK

ByungHoon Kim

Albany State University
LW

Louise Wrensford

Albany State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 9

5:00pm

P10-Enhancing Students' Engagement, Confidence, and Performance Through the Half-Semester Research-Based Laboratory
Yong Jin Lee

Typical science curricula use traditional cookbooks for the laboratory courses, which may result in students' lack of understanding of science in those courses. To address this problem and to enhance students' hands-on experience and critical thinking, the half-semester research-based laboratory was implemented in a microbiology course. After learning basic microbiological techniques, students explored a research topic by submitting a research proposal, conducting a research independently, and submitting a final report. Based on the pre- and post-lab exams, students did not show significant improvement after the research activity; however, the post-survey found that students clearly showed more positive attitudes toward the course and high confidence in laboratory tasks. During the presentation, the structure and components of research-based laboratory will be discussed and the outcomes will be shared with the audience who want to implement research-based activity in their courses.

Speakers
YJ

Yong Jin Lee

Albany State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 10

5:00pm

P11-Helping STEM Students Find a Sense of Belongingness and Stay Excited about Their Studies
Margie Lewkowicz, Brooke Skelton

Georgia Perimeter College's Educate and Nurture Leadership in STEM (ENLISTEM) Scholars Program, funded by an NSF S-STEM grant, has found that an extra-curricular program combining opportunities for students to interact with STEM experts, and lead children in STEM activities helps collegiate STEM students find a sense of belongingness that encourages their persistence through the rigor of STEM coursework. ENLISTEM Scholars receive financial support, but we have found great benefit to ENLISTEM Scholars through field trips to businesses that employ STEM professionals and speakers that present novel opportunities and/or real-world advice. In addition, ENLISTEM Scholars find serving the community by inspiring young children to discover the wonders of math and science very rewarding. The purpose of this poster is to share the experience of the ENLISTEM Scholars Program so other schools can implement practices that excite students with little financial investment.

Speakers
ML

Margie Lewkowicz

Georgia State University
BS

Brooke Skelton

Georgia State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 11

5:00pm

P12-Increasing Self-Regulated Learning in the Millennial Classroom
Jessica McCain, Michelle vanDellen

College teachers are increasingly concerned about a lack of self-regulation in Millennial students. We tested an intervention to increase self-regulated learning in 71 undergraduate students from a psychology statistics course. At the beginning and end of the semester, we measured narcissism, entitlement, external locus of control, helicopter parenting, achievement goal orientation, and several study strategies and beliefs about learning using the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ). Half of the participants received the intervention first, while the other participants completed practice problems. At midterm, all participants switched conditions. For the intervention, participants completed a worksheet each week identifying a problem area in the material and making a plan to address this area in the coming week. The group receiving the intervention first earned significantly higher final grades. Mediation analyses suggest that a decrease in external locus of control drove this difference.

Speakers
JM

Jessica McCain

University of Georgia
MV

Michelle vanDellen

University of Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 12

5:00pm

P13-Development of a Biology Resource Center
Jeanelle Morgan

The development of a Biology Resource Center will provide innovative tools for student success and foster a sense of community for biology students. This will bring together students from different years, classes, and interests, promoting a sense of ownership and inclusion. The resources will aid students as they prepare for exams, internships, and conferences and will help promote high impact practices. High impact practices such as experimental design and problem solving, rigorous data analysis and interpretation, writing and speaking across the curriculum among others can be utilized and honed. An innovative inclusion will be workshops on topics of interest to biology students. With this project, students will have the opportunity to gain leadership experience as peer tutors and peer mentors. This poster will discuss the planning and initial implementation of this project.

Speakers
JM

Jeanelle Morgan

University of North Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 13

5:00pm

P14-The 'Write' Stuff: Promoting Critical Thinking with Student-Authored Reading Cards
Katherine Perrotta

This session illustrates how to promote engagement and critical thinking about course readings with student authored reading cards. Students were assigned to write questions about assigned chapters from the course text. The presenter will describe the process in which the reading cards were assigned, and how to use the reading cards as discussion prompts, debate topics, and short-answer options for course assessments. The presenter will provide index cards and sample readings for participants to try the activity and discuss how they can adapt this activity for their own classes.

Speakers
KP

Katherine Perrotta

Kennesaw State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 14

5:00pm

P15-Development of Inquiry Based Labs in Introductory Non- Major Biology Course
Linda Purvis, Swapna Bhat

Our current non-majors introductory biology course laboratory material has become very passive for student learning. This is a popular course yet also a basic core requirement that students must take. However, most come into the course with the predisposition that it will be boring and have no application for their career or life. After attending a recent conference on introductory based lab education, the idea was born to update some of the current lab materials in this course. Materials currently used are almost two decades old and do not reflect a lot of the recent advances made in biology. We aim to introduce guided inquiry based labs that are up-to-date and relevant to everyday life. The overall purpose of this project is to provide innovate and creative lab experiences for non-science focused students while initiating engaging lab modules that will replace our current passive learning set up.

Speakers
SB

Swapna Bhat

Univeristy of North Georgia
LP

Linda Purvis

University of North Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 15

5:00pm

P16-Don't Just Guess, Assess: Measures for Community Engaged Learning
Kirsten Rodgers, Scott Butler

Community engagement is an integral component for the development and practice of high level cognitive skills that are introduced in the classroom. Assessment of community engagement in curricular or co-curricular activities can be abstract. A model for assessing public health community engagement activities within a liberal arts framework and the use of a standard professional practice measure can provide the structure needed to assess student critical thinking skills. In this presentation, faculty and students will present how community engagement in a liberal arts college is increasing public health students' critical thinking and communication abilities. Description and assessment of community engagement activities in obesity prevention and sexual health will be discussed.

Speakers
SB

Scott Butler

Georgia College
KR

Kirsten Rodgers

Georgia College & State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 16

5:00pm

P17-A Scalable Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experience in Molecular Parasitology for Producing Competent Graduates: Grounding Student Perceptions with Core Competencies
Michael Sanderson, Nancy Russell, Mariya Campbell, Therese Poole, Paul Ulrich

Studies have shown that providing undergraduates with research experience can lead to persistence in STEM fields. We propose a scalable course-based undergraduate research experience (CURE) in molecular parasitology that blends bioinformatics analysis and molecular experimentation. Science literacy, self-directed learning, critical thinking, and ability to develop argument were monitored using coding-rubrics for writing assignments, journal club reports, and weekly learning logs. The CURE survey (Lopatto et al.) was modified to provide pre- and post-course measurement of perceptual gains in student skills, confidence, and science identity. Analysis of the initial cohort enrolled in the study, indicate that gains in competence and self-directed learning are aligned with self-reported gains in science identity and scientific competence. We anticipate that our CURE will inform efforts to build high-impact platforms for undergraduate research that can be scaled up throughout USG.


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 17

5:00pm

P18-Student Perceptions of Critical Thinking Writing Assignments in Non-Major Science Courses
Ryan Tainsh

Two critical thinking writing assignments were implemented in non-major science courses and student perceptions of these assignments were measured. Each assignment was based on a documentary film involving evolution. Both assignments reinforced evolution, critical thinking skills, and the relevance of evolution. Students from two courses were asked to respond to perception surveys regarding both assignments. Students reported that critical thinking assignments and non-exam evaluations are appropriate for a non-major science course. Additionally, students reported that each assignment increased their knowledge for the topic, fostered critical thinking skills, and promoted creativity. This work shows that students value assignments that reinforce skills, provide context to course topics, and provide an alternative to traditional course exams. These data provide an opportunity to investigate the effect of such assignments on the performance of students in non-major science courses.

Speakers
RT

Ryan Tainsh

Johnson & Wales University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 18

5:00pm

P19-The Advantages of a Student's Vantage Point
Monica Williams Smith

Consulting is a well-known profession in which professionals offer suggestions to improve a company's current practices. In New Venture Management, students engage in the thought process of how entrepreneurs create and design viable business ideas. As a class exercise, a fairly new business owner invited students into their world and shared problems experienced since creating the business. Using the information learned in the course coupled with critical thinking, students worked in teams and created strategies to assist the entrepreneur. In this presentation, the audience will be presented with the information about this class exercise and the outcome of the student/entrepreneur interaction.

Speakers
MW

Monica Williams Smith

University of West Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 19

5:00pm

P20-Service Learning and Critical Thinking in an Introduction to Social Problems Course
Margaret Williamson

How can I incorporate Service-learning in my class? How can I use Service-learning to foster critical thinking skills? What are classroom-management techniques I can use to be successful? These are some questions to ask when considering this type of project. Service-learning is considered a High Impact Practice and a way to engage students in the classroom and in their community. In addition, Service-learning is a way to foster critical thinking skills. This presentation will focus on how Service-learning can create critical thinking opportunities for students, the three questions asked above, as well as how L. Dee Fink's Taxonomy of Significant Learning can be incorporated. Lastly, incorporating Service-learning into a class can provide an opportunity for research. This will be discussed briefly. The intended audience includes faculty interested in Service-learning and critical thinking.

Speakers
MW

Margaret Williamson

University of North Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 20

5:00pm

P21-Stabitha and the Amateur Strategists: Using Tabletop RPGs for Team Building
Aaron Wimer, Morgan Rhetts, and Ana Guimaraes

This session is devoted to how using role playing games (namely Dungeons and Dragons) has boosted employee bonding and team building in two consolidating universities. While cultural difference remain between the staffs, they are being eroded as the staffs create a common environmental experience (role playing games). Meet ups are monthly, and involve between 10 and 15 librarians and library staff. These kind of games encourage outside of the box thinking, problem solving, teamwork, and learning about each other both as an individual and a team member. With the renewed popularity in tabletop gaming and the encouragement of library administrators, we were able to create a unit of highly motivated and flexible employees who are already comfortable working with one another and have come up with some creative solutions to issues in our libraries.

Speakers
AG

Ana Guimaraes

Collection Development Librarian, Kennesaw State University
MR

Morgan Rhetts

Kennesaw State University
AW

Aaron Wimer

Kennesaw State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 21

5:00pm

P22-Infusion of Nanotechnology in General Chemistry II Lab
Xiaomei Zheng, Amir Saheb,Louise Wrensford

General Chemistry Lab courses commonly are taught in a traditional format, in which the labs are presented 'cookbook' style where the students read the instructions and follow the directions to carry out the steps as written. We implemented a research based inquiry lab module on nanotechnology in our general chemistry II lab classes to increase students' engagement, critical thinking skills, problem solving skills, technical skills and collaborative work. The student learning was assessed through pre- and post-lab surveys, pre- and post-lab tests and lab reports with pre- and post-lab assignments. Results indicated a significant improvement in the understanding of experimental techniques. According to survey data, students expressed an increase in confidence in understanding the experimental techniques, and 60% of students expressed that the overall experience with lab modules on nanotechnology was excellent. This project was supported by an NSF Targeted Infusion Grant #HRD-1436265.

Speakers
AS

Amir Saheb

Albany State University
LW

Louise Wrensford

Albany State University
XZ

Xiaomei Zheng

Albany State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 22

5:00pm

P23-An Investigation of the Impact of Compiler's Feedback on the Comprehension andPerformance of Computer Programmers
Tamiat Abegaz

A number of research findings indicate that messages displayed to the human operator generally affect the emotion of the operator, which in turn influences the operator's performance in handling a given situation. One of the various challenges students face during programming courses is to diagnose and respond to syntax errors. In most programming languages, compilers or interpreters are the ones that generate the syntax errors. However, the ways the errors were presented mostly resulted in frustration and discouragement, especially for novice programmers. The purpose of this presentation is to explore and propose ways to incorporate low level emotional design elements as part of compiler's feedback to enhance a positive affect, which in turn promotes creative thinking to improve the programmers' performance.

Speakers
TA

Tamiat Abegaz

University of North Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 23

5:00pm

P24-How to Make Online Grading & Feedback More Efficient and Effective
Li-Mei Chen, Chunlei Liu

If you teach online, have you ever felt overwhelmed by the amount of student submissions waiting for you to grade? Have you felt frustrated with students' repetitive errors even though they have been marked and commented upon? If you answer yes to either of the questions, come to this session. With much online teaching experience, we will share with you numerous tips and strategies to make your online grading more effective and efficient. We will also demonstrate how to embed reflection as a feedback dialogue to communicate with students online to improve their writing. Finally, we will share how online instructors can use a systematic method to track their students' performance and guide their own instruction to reflect different student needs.

Speakers
LC

Li-Mei Chen

Valdosta State University
CL

Chunlei Liu

Valdosta State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 24

5:00pm

P25-Critical Thinking and Student Engagement: Metacognitive Writing Strategies That Reach Them All
Alecia Dressel, Paulette Harris, Mary Banks-Murray, Nai-Cheng Kuo, Carissa Parrish, Marissa Powers, Andrea Shervette

Through our participation in the Georgia Milestones Workshop, sponsored by the Teacher Quality Grant, we have been able to implement writing strategies across multiple grade levels, diverse student populations, content areas, and school systems. At this session, we will discuss various research-based writing practices that have improved our students' critical thinking skills. Our goal for this session is to share writing practices that we have seen improve student engagement and develop critical thinking skills as they become more successful writers. Through continued efforts to find multiple pathways to reach students at their current levels, we are able to guide them to higher levels of academic success.

Speakers
MB

Mary Banks-Murray

Thomson McDuffie Middle School, McDuffie County, GA
AD

Alecia Dressel

Augusta University
avatar for Paulette Harris

Paulette Harris

Higher Education Faculty, Augusta University
Dr. Harris holds the Cree-Walker Endowed Chair in the College of Education at Augusta University. She created courses on Grants writing and Philanthropic Development. She leads groups on a regular basis on how-to-write grants. She is the founder and director of the Augusta University's Literacy Center.
NK

Nai-Cheng Kuo

Augusta University
CP

Carissa Parrish

Sue Reynolds Elementary, Richmond County, GA
MP

Marissa Powers

Mildred E. Freeman Elementary, Warren County, GA
AS

Andrea Shervette

Mildred E. Freeman Elementary, Warren County, GA


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 25

5:00pm

P27-How Using Web Design to Explore Authors, Literary Periods, and Texts in American Literature Effectively Engages Students in Scholarly Research
Joanna Grisham

For this project, students work in pairs to conduct scholarly research about an author and design a website that other students or teachers could use for scholarly purposes. The authors' works designated for the project are in the public domain, so texts are linkable and available for scholarly pursuits. This project requires extensive research and writing and takes the place of a traditional research paper, while offering students an opportunity to engage in serious scholarship. The emphasis on scholarly research highlights the value of retrieving information from reliable sources. The project culminates with a presentation; students show their website to the class and discuss the content, as well as any interesting information uncovered during the research process. Students find this project engaging, informative, and more useful than writing an essay, as they enjoy working with technology and participating in a collaborative activity that is creative and scholarly.

Speakers
JG

Joanna Grisham

Central Georgia Technical College


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 27

5:00pm

P28-UNG Online Student Readiness Implementation – SmarterMeasure
Stephanie Hulsey, Merci Rivera

Determining a student’s readiness for online instruction is paramount to their success. In order to make this determination at the University of North Georgia, the SmarterMeasure Readiness Assessment was piloted in July 2013, with full implementation following in August, 2014. We will share our experiences with implementation, and share our data as it compares to the SmarterMeasure National Student Readiness Report. We hope our experience can help those who are contemplating or beginning to use the SmarterMeasure assessment.

Speakers
avatar for Merciaileen Rivera Almodóvar

Merciaileen Rivera Almodóvar

University of North Georgia
avatar for Stephanie Hulsey

Stephanie Hulsey

Coordinator of Online Student Success, University of North Georgia
Student Success Statistics, Online Readiness / Preparation, Online Student Services and Orientation


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 28

5:00pm

P29-E-Commerce Teaching Via Project-Based Learning Advances USG STEM Goals
Kamal Kakish, Yaquan Xu

In this presentation, the authors describe the teaching of e-commerce as a project based. The e-commerce project based learning is designed and implemented at Georgia Gwinnett College for undergraduate Information Technology and Business students. The teaching objectives of this course are to develop the students' knowledge and skills, in the use of e-commerce site building tools, teamwork, and entrepreneurship. The authors focus on real-life situations and challenges, offer exposure to major considerations involved in e-commerce systems, and facilitate understanding of e-commerce implementation strategies from both business and technology perspectives. The results of student surveys indicate that the project-based teamwork approach to teaching e-commerce accomplishes its goals. The students' feedback as well as the authors' experience indicate that students enjoy the collaborative part of the course and the benefits from the creativity and self-direction.

Speakers
KK

Kamal Kakish

Assistant Dean, Georgia Gwinnett College
e-Commerce; Open-source SW; Project Based Learning
YX

Yaquan Xu

Georgia Gwinnett College


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 29

5:00pm

P30-The Effects of Education Abroad and Education Abroad in Sustainability on Levels of Student Engagement
Adam Landon, Donald Rubin, Michael Tarrant

Student learning is in part a function of engagement. However, not all environments are conducive to student engagement. Study abroad (SA) is one mechanism identified to enhance student engagement. Additionally, it has been hypothesized that SA in sustainability, where students critically reflect on their beliefs, may yield higher engagement. In this investigation we test the added value of SA and SA in sustainability on engagement. In a 2x2x2 factorial design we empirically test the effects of time (pre-post) location (abroad-home campus) and content (sustainability - non-sustainability) on student engagement. Results indicate SA programs achieve higher levels of student engagement than courses on campus, and that sustainability content may facilitate engagement. These results have implications for the positioning of education abroad within higher education as a means to give students broader global perspectives, and as a mechanism for more effective student engagement.

Speakers
AL

Adam Landon

University of Georgia
DR

Donald Rubin

University of Georgia
MT

Michael Tarrant

University of Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 30

5:00pm

P31-A Flipped Classroom - Peer-led Team Learning Reform to Promote Student Success in Large Organic Chemistry Courses
Suazette Mooring, Joan Mutanyatta-Coma

Organic Chemistry is a critical course for students pursuing undergraduate degrees in STEM. This course has traditionally been challenging and can discourage many students from continuing in STEM degrees. Given the high failure rates for this course, it is imperative that we find curriculum innovations that will improve the performance of students from all backgrounds in this course. To this end, we have implemented flipped classroom-Peer-led Team Learning (PLTL) reform model in the high enrollment Organic Chemistry courses at our institution. Herein, we will present the preliminary results of this implementation on two sections of Organic Chemistry. The results of the reform on students' attitude and perceptions toward the course format and on student performance will be discussed. This presentation is intended for STEM or related faculty interested in the outcomes and implementation of active-learning strategies.

Speakers
SM

Suazette Mooring

Assitant Professor, Georgia State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 31

5:00pm

P32-BioCalculus - A Classroom Flip that is Truly Reflective
Rebecca Rizzo

APOS theory emphasizes that learning through reflection is the key to strengthening critical thinking skills and achieving a higher order of thinking. This presentation examines the reflection strategies used in the GSU BioCalculus course sequence to gain increased conceptual knowledge by students and hence overall success rate in the course. Using a combination of lecture, grading and pedagogical shifts, it has become possible to create a flipped classroom that is reflective while measuring the student's analysis skills and ability to apply their learning to their lives. The intended audience is any mathematics instructor from grades 6 through 12 as well as University level.

Speakers
RR

Rebecca Rizzo

Georgia College & State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 32

5:00pm

P33-Exploring and Challenging Gender Stereotypes with Pre-Service Teachers
Kinga Varga-Dobai, Shelly Black, James Kelley, Amy Boldin

This poster session will feature best practices used with pre-service teachers in an early childhood literacy course to develop critical thinking skills, specifically in relation to representations of gender issues in literature and other text in the curriculum. The presenter of this session will showcase the various ways in which pre-service teachers addressed the issue of gender stereotyping and gender roles from a historical perspective. From critical discussions of picture books displaying gender stereotypes, to digital projects on gender representation, as well as lesson plan ideas on the topic of women’s suffrage movement in the early childhood curriculum, this poster session will rely on original student work. Intended audience of this session: classroom teachers and university instructors.

Speakers
KV

Kinga Varga-Dobai

Assistant professor, Georgia Gwinnett College


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 33

5:00pm

P34-Connecting Language Learners with Native Speakers
Sabrina Wengier

This session is aimed primarily at language instructors. This session will address the benefits and challenges of including regular guided conversations with native speakers to an intermediate language course curriculum. This session will also consider the impact of such conversations on students' oral proficiency and whether regular interaction with native speakers outside of class helps lower anxiety in speaking.

Speakers
SW

Sabrina Wengier

Middle Georgia State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 34

5:00pm

P35-Ethical & Best Practices in On-line Teaching and Communication
Angela Wilson

At a time where synchronous and/or asynchronous on-line class instruction is becoming more and more significant amongst colleges and universities across the country and internationally; the need for a more structured and systematic approach to on-line teaching is becoming more apparent as well. The session will explore best practices and effective approaches to the on-line instructional environment. Topics the presenters will explore include: Ethics and communication, Instructional designs, and Technology implementation. The session would be beneficial to both the beginning on-line instructor as well as the advanced on-line educator looking to enhance overall student learning and engagement.

Speakers
avatar for Angela Wilson

Angela Wilson

Savannah State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 35

5:00pm

P36-Implementing an Online Solution to a Low Enrollment College Algebra Learning Support Class
Mary Wolfe

When faced with a mandate to implement a new learning support class with low enrollment across multiple campuses, an online solution seemed in order, especially since we had no idea if any students at all would be eligible for enrollment. Vendor online solutions were evaluated and selected so that the support course complemented the gateway course while engaging the students. The result was 14 enrolled students from across 3 campuses. Data was collected and analyzed. Lessons learned will be discussed.

Speakers
MW

Mary Wolfe

Middle Georgia State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 36

5:00pm

P37-Discovering the "Tipping Point": The Surprising Effects of Tutorial Visits on Student GPA and Self-Efficacy

Eliot Rendleman, Emily Reed

Many instructors assume that tutoring only contributes to academic success. Research in writing center studies appears to support such assumptions. Studies have reported increases in intrinsic motivation, positive attitudes about mandatory visits, retention rates, number of student drafts, higher assignment and course grades, and confidence. Although the assumptions and data-driven research seem irrefutable, recent research uncovers evidence that suggests too many tutorial visits may undermine the efforts to support Complete College Georgia initiative. In this poster session, the presenters will reveal a tutorial visitation threshold found at one writing center. Sharing their original, data-driven research, this professor and student research team will demonstrate that too many visits to writing tutorial services may result in lower grades and self-efficacy. The audience members are invited to share their experience and to interrogate collaboratively the methods and results of the session.



Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
  • Poster Number 37

5:30pm

Social Reception - Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

Networking is one of the most valued aspects of this conference. We hope you will join us for the Social Reception on Wednesday afternoon from 5:30 – 6:30. The reception is held in the Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria along with the Poster session and Exhibitors,  allowing for many opportunities to meet and mingle with colleagues and new friends. 


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria
 
Thursday, April 14
 

7:30am

Registration/Check In - 7:30am-10:30am
Please check in at the Conference Registration Desk and pick up your name badge, conference materials, and printed program information.

Thursday April 14, 2016 7:30am - 10:30am
Conference Registration Desk

8:00am

A Practical Guide to Creating an OER Text
Terri Bell, Deborah Prosser, Allison Galloup

This session is directed toward faculty who want to produce an open textbook and need practical advice on how to begin and progress through the project. Topics to be covered include: assembling a team, project planning and management, organizing content, licensing and copyright clearance, and formatting and publishing options.

Speakers
avatar for Terri Bell

Terri Bell

Copyright compliance, University of North Georgia
AG

Allison Galloup

University of North Georgia
DP

Deborah Prosser

Dean of Libraries, University of North Georgia


Thursday April 14, 2016 8:00am - 8:45am
Room K

8:00am

An Online Database as a Textbook Alternative in Freshman-level Geology and Astronomy

Dion Stewart, Mary Ann Cullen, Bayard Stringer

Online alternatives to traditional textbooks lower educational costs for students and provide immediate access to the text. However, free, high-quality, online texts are not readily available in most science disciplines. This presentation explores the solution of using readings from a science reference database (AccessScience) to replace all or some of assigned textbook readings in freshman-level geology and astronomy classes.

A quantitative comparison of student performance on exams and quizzes is used to assess the relative learning experience of the database readers compared to the traditional textbook readers. Class surveys were used to determine student satisfaction and self-reported compliance with course reading assignments. A librarian collaborating on the project will join the science instructors to discuss the benefits and challenges of using a database in lieu of a textbook and the issues associated with the possible expansion of this approach into other disciplines.



Thursday April 14, 2016 8:00am - 8:45am
Room L

8:00am

College Success is Everybody's Business: First-Year Workshops in a Blended Learning Environment
Robert Bleil, Lisa McNea

In Fall 2015 the College of Coastal Georgia eliminated its College Success Seminar requirement for all new first-year students. This two-credit course, in place for more than a decade, introduced students to the expectations of and the resources provided by the College, but the course was also widely viewed as a financial burden for students and faculty participation was at a historic low. College Success Seminar was replaced by a three-part system that included a summer orientation, two days of workshops at the beginning of the semester, and a seven-week blended learning experience facilitated by student leaders. This session, led by the director of e-learning and a member of the English faculty, will demonstrate the online components of the system, examine the challenges of leading with online tools in at an access institution, and will demonstrate a research technique that faculty in any discipline can use in their classes.

Speakers
RB

Robert Bleil

College of Coastal Georgia
avatar for Lisa  McNeal

Lisa McNeal

Director of eLearning, College of Coastal Georgia
Online learning, student engagement, faculty development


Thursday April 14, 2016 8:00am - 8:45am
Room V/W

8:00am

Highly Engaged Learning - How Can We Make It Happen?
Julie Hentges, Elizabeth Dierking, Lesi Smart

During this session, presenters will provide student engagement techniques to encourage constructive time on task behavior. Conference attendees interested in promoting critical thinking and student engagement will appreciate the organized format of this session. Conference members will be encouraged to be active participants in this setting. The structured format of the session is designed to promote critical thinking which will enhance student engagement and achievement. Purposefully, the objective of this workshop is to provide conference attendees with solid take-away strategies; such as, total participation techniques appropriate for application in their classroom setting.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Dierking

Elizabeth Dierking

Instructor, University of Central Missouri
30+ years as an elementary teacher and 5 years as an instructor at UCM. Literacy coach and beginning teacher program facilitator. Training includes reading and writing workshop as well as presenter for using interactive graphic organizers as an instructional strategy.
avatar for Dr. Julie Hentges

Dr. Julie Hentges

Associate Professor, University of Central Missouri
Dr. Julie Hentges, Associate Professor, University of Central, MO (UCM) is a certified teacher and a certified K-12 reading specialist in Missouri. Dr. Hentges holds a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in Education as well as an earned Doctorate with an emphasis in teacher education. Dr. Hentges’ current research interest addresses teaching reading to accelerate student engagement and achievement.
LS

Lesi Smart

University of Central Missouri


Thursday April 14, 2016 8:00am - 8:45am
Room Q

8:00am

Using Multiple Note Taking Strategies to Enhance Assessment Performance in Biology Courses: Blue, Green or Yellow Notebook?
Danilo Baylen, Erin Duckett

This presentation describes and discusses ways of improving comprehension, retention and recall of concepts in introductory Biology courses using multiple note taking strategies. Using color-coded notebooks (blue, yellow or green), students were asked to employ one of the note taking strategies (traditional, concept mapping, or visual mapping) in creating study guides for each chapter included in the course assessment. Relationships between a specific note taking strategy and student performance in multiple end-of-unit assessments were investigated. This presentation will engage interested audience through the sharing of experiences based on data collected during a 14-week term. Presenters discuss the challenges experienced from data collection and analysis. This presentation session will be beneficial to those working with college students who are interested in designing strategies, techniques, and efforts that support institutional plans for Complete College Georgia.

Speakers
DB

Danilo Baylen

University of West Georgia
ED

Erin Duckett

University of West Georgia


Thursday April 14, 2016 8:00am - 8:45am
Room Y/Z

8:00am

Using Risk and Intervention to Increase Student Success
Carrie Carmack

The purpose of this presentation is to describe a method for identifying students at risk of earning a D, F, or withdrawing from a course by placing them into a Risk Category (Low Risk, Moderate Risk, or High Risk) based on a pre-assessment. Once a student has been categorized, intervention can begin for those that need it, based on their level of need. I will discuss which on-campus resources are most effective for each Risk Category and how faculty can begin intervention within the first week of classes. Evidence shows that using this intervention technique can increase student success and create a more confident and happy student.

Speakers
CC

Carrie Carmack

University of West Georgia


Thursday April 14, 2016 8:00am - 8:45am
Room R

8:00am

What Students Want: Collision or Collaboration in the Multimodal Classroom?
Jo Anne Harris, Gina Foster, Elizabeth Vance

In an age in which technology changes at light speeds, pedagogies have become kaleidoscopes of shifting, adapting, and sometimes colliding methods for teaching students who are multi-cultural, multi-technological, multi-generational, multi-gender . . . multi-everything. This begs the question of how to bring order to a disorderly space in which "differentiation" has become a buzzword for providing students with individualized pedagogical space to explore their individual multiplicities. In order to answer this question and provide attendees a collaborative model for engaging students, this session is led by a team of three presenters, two students and the instructor of an upper level English Literature course required for Teacher Certification. By focusing on the use of multimodality and active learning techniques we provide attendees with three different perspectives for scaffolding texts and technology using techniques that work well for any discipline.

Speakers
GF

Gina Foster

Georgia Gwinnett College
JA

Jo Anne Harris

Georgia Gwinnett College
EV

Elizabeth Vance

Georgia Gwinnett College


Thursday April 14, 2016 8:00am - 8:45am
Room T/U

9:00am

'You mean, I don't have to come there?' Advisement and Orientation at a Distance
Jessie Daniels

This presentation introduces opportunities to rethink advisement and orientation in the light of online learning. While it seems easy enough to decide to do advisement over the phone or through video chat, documenting and sharing constantly changing information has been a challenge for this new online undergraduate program. Many programs often require a face to face orientation, but is it worth the cost to you and your students? Learn what didn't work, what's working for now, and share your own ideas for advisement and orientation at a distance. This presentation is designed for those who are or plan to be involved with distance learning programs or students.

Speakers
avatar for Jessie Daniels

Jessie Daniels

Online BBA Program Coordinator, University of Georgia
Online teaching and learning, new media and digital literacies, TED and/or TEDx talks and events


Thursday April 14, 2016 9:00am - 9:45am
Room T/U

9:00am

Adaptive Courseware and Its Power to Improve Student Success and Retention

Hank Bowman, Ric Rebne

This session will allow attendees to look beyond adaptive learning as a buzzword by giving thorough insights into its definition, implementation and potential to improve classroom results. By analyzing the successful Adaptive Courseware pilots at Arizona State University, this session provides attendees with unprecedented insight into the promise of adaptive learning. Not only will the attendees learn how to introduce adaptive learning technologies into their teaching but also see the strong evidence of its positive effect on the learners' experience.


Speakers
avatar for Hank Bowman

Hank Bowman

Vice-President of Academic Partnerships, CogBooks
At CogBooks we’re committed to transforming the way you teach and your students learn, by applying science-based methods to education. | | Through our unique advanced adaptive learning technologies, we’re changing the way secondary and further education students learn – in the US, UK and worldwide. | | We believe our technology will define the next generation of education, empowering teachers and institutions like never before... Read More →


Thursday April 14, 2016 9:00am - 9:45am
Room F/G

9:00am

Coping with Challenges of Online Learning by Promoting Self-Regulated Learners
Jackie Kim

Adopting Zimmerman's (1986, 1989, 1998, 2000) social cognitive model of self-regulated learning (SRL) as a theoretical framework, this presentation will discuss how students use SRL strategies in a learning community to complete tasks and cope with challenges in a Web-based course. Therefore, the goal of this research project was to transform the online class into a "community of survival" where students could learn self-regulatory skills by becoming models for their peers and by learning from both their peers and their instructor. This study provides the intended audiences, such as online educators and online designers, with a set of practical, empirically based guidelines to promote self-regulatory skills in online environments and recommends they consider their students' needs for self-regulation training as they strive to provide engaging and effective learning and instruction.

Speakers
JK

Jackie Kim

Armstrong State University


Thursday April 14, 2016 9:00am - 9:45am
Room V/W

9:00am

Everything you wanted to know about OERs but were afraid to ask: From Ground Zero to Implementation and Beyond
Loleta Sartin, Molly Kimsey

Are you thinking of utilizing open education resources (OERs), in lieu of a textbook? Do you want more information of how to start the process? Are you wondering about the benefits and barriers? If you answered yes, this interactive presentation is for you. Participants will discuss redesigning a course using OERs, examine benefits and barriers, and review student and faculty feedback about the pros and cons. This session is designed for the person relatively new to the OER process. The presenters will present lessons learned and discuss the steps involved in compiling OERs.

Speakers
MK

Molly Kimsey

Middle Georgia State University
LS

Loleta Sartin

Middle Georgia State University


Thursday April 14, 2016 9:00am - 9:45am
Room K

9:00am

Increasing Engineering Student Success and Engagement Through an Integrated, Collaborative First-Year Seminar
Nirmal Trivedi, Hillary Steiner, Lori Lowder, Laura Ruhala, Ruth Goldfine

This presentation describes the result of a collaboration between several faculty members on two campuses to develop a course that will equip first-year engineering majors with the skills and strategies they need to succeed in STEM courses. Supported by a Complete College Georgia Incubate grant, this course, to be offered in fall 2016, is rooted in literature on self-regulation and active learning and is based on a similar model that promoted student success and engagement among first-year biology and chemistry majors. Conference participants interested in learning more about engaging first-year programs and how they can adapt them for their own institutions are invited to attend.

Speakers
RG

Ruth Goldfine

Kennesaw State University
LL

Lori Lowder

Kennesaw State University
avatar for Laura Ruhala

Laura Ruhala

Kennesaw State University
avatar for Hillary Steiner

Hillary Steiner

Assistant Professor and Associate Director of Learning Communities, Kennesaw State University
avatar for Nirmal Trivedi

Nirmal Trivedi

Kennesaw State University


Thursday April 14, 2016 9:00am - 9:45am
Room Y/Z

9:00am

Isn't it Just a Story? Promoting Critical Thinking in Psychology through Community Engaged Learning with StoryCorps
Christina Grange, Dianna King, Ryan Smith, Jasmine Threatt

Public media provides exciting opportunities to bring the diverse complexities of the world to the psychology classroom. It can challenge students to apply psychological concepts to a range of global and individual experiences. StoryCorps (www.storycorps.org) is one public media production that can aid in this effort using an instructional paradigm grounded in community, cooperation, and applied learning. This conference presentation will be an exemplar of this approach, demonstrating how students are guided to work in groups to develop multi-media projects reflecting their understanding of psychological concepts applied to StoryCorps stories. Student perspectives will be integrated into the presentation to reflect perceived illuminate benefits and challenges present when using public media as a stool for teaching and learning. Finally, audience members will be invited to participate in exchanges about how public media can creatively be integrated into a range of content areas.

Speakers
CG

Christina Grange

Clayton State University
DK

Dianna King

Clayton State University
RS

Ryan Smith

Clayton State University
JT

Jasmine Threatt

Clayton State University


Thursday April 14, 2016 9:00am - 9:45am
Room Q

9:00am

Modeling Critical Thinking in Asynchronous Discussion Forums
Justin Garcia

This presentation will introduce a model of critical thinking and demonstrate how professors can use it to model critical thinking in online asynchronous discussion forums. Learning goals for this session include: (1) Understand the model of critical thinking, (2) Exemplify the “moves" of the professor in an asynchronous discussion forum guided by the model of critical thinking and (3) Recognize how to ask questions that encourage students to recognize the patterns of their thinking, that is, the inherent assumptions in their thinking, the implications that follow from their thinking, and the clarity of their thinking. In this session attendees will have 3-4 opportunities to discuss and practice the concepts and techniques.

Speakers
avatar for Justin Garcia

Justin Garcia

Professor and Department Chair, DeVry University, Fresno California


Thursday April 14, 2016 9:00am - 9:45am
Room L

9:00am

This will NOT be on a test: Meditation and Maintaining Student (and Faculty) Self-care
Marquita Jackson-Minot, Gissia De Moya, Cristina Pinheiro

This interactive presentation is for anyone who experiences stress in his or her life. The following questions will be addressed: What are the largest stressors college students face, what are effective ways that instructors can help students handle stress, and do techniques such as exercise, deep breathing, and meditation assigned in a specific course during a semester help decrease student stress? During this presentation preservice teachers will discuss ways in which participating in specific relaxation techniques influenced their stress levels as related to their general self-care. Participants will create an interactive graphic organizer based upon the information garnered in the presentation.

Speakers
MJ

Marquita Jackson-Minot

Georgia Gwinnett College
GD

Gissia De Moya

Georgia Gwinnett College
CP

Cristina Pinheiro

Georgia Gwinnett College


Thursday April 14, 2016 9:00am - 9:45am
Room R

9:45am

Morning Break
Thursday April 14, 2016 9:45am - 10:15am
Kellogg Concourse

10:00am

Assessing Writing Self-Efficacy of Students in Graduate Nursing School
Lisa Robinson, Mary Bishop

Scholarly written expression is a difficult skill for many graduate-nursing students, as it is not a topic generally taught in undergraduate nursing programs. The acquisition of writing skills is a long term learning process requiring personal practice, considerable effort and the involvement in training activities (Zimmerman & Kitsantaas, 1999). This study describes the implementation and evaluation of a one credit-writing course developed for an online graduate nursing program in the southeastern United States. The study summarizes students' perceptions of their writing self-efficacy before and after the writing course. During the third week of class and during the last week of the fall semester the first year graduate students were asked to complete the PSWSES: Post-Secondary Writing Self-Efficacy Instrument. Additionally, students and faculty were interviewed to evaluate the course and the extent to which the course and program learning outcomes were met.

Speakers
avatar for Mary Bishop

Mary Bishop

University of West Georgia
avatar for Lisa Robinson

Lisa Robinson

Assistant Professor, University of West Georgia


Thursday April 14, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am
Room V/W

10:00am

Dual enrollment in the High School: Faculty Perspectives
Katherine Kipp, Laura Ng, David Slutzky, Steve Smith

Our university offers Accel, or dual-enrollment, college courses that are taught by university faculty in the high school. The program supports Complete College Georgia by offering core courses tuition free to high school students so that they can enter college after high school with a year's worth of credits accumulated, thus reducing the time and expense needed to complete their degree. We are presenting a panel discussion of our experiences as faculty teaching these courses. We will discuss the obstacles we encountered in the high schools and how we dealt with these issues to create an engaging learning experience for the students. Our panel consists of English, Economics, Math, and Psychology instructors. The audience will have the opportunity to engage in discussion and we will provide a Tip Sheet of issues to expect and ways to ease the transition from college classroom to high school classroom.

Speakers
KK

Katherine Kipp

University of North Georgia
avatar for Laura Ng

Laura Ng

Assistant Professor of English, University of North Georgia
Dr. Laura Ng is an associate professor of English at the University of North Georgia. Her research interests include gender, peace studies, and the scholarship of teaching and learning.
DS

David Slutzky

University of North Georgia
SS

Steve Smith

University of North Georgia


Thursday April 14, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am
Room Y/Z

10:00am

Engaging Students in the Digital Age
Perry Samson

On average, today's college students bring 2 digital devices to their learning environment. These devices present both an opportunity and an obstacle to learning. The opportunity is to engage the students through their devices, to use the technology to help students achieve higher academic outcomes, and to collect meaningful, actionable data on what is occurring during the "learning moment". The potential obstacle is competing with their social connections via their digital devices. This presentation will address both subjects, and demonstrate how the presenter has overcome the obstacle and embraced the opportunity.

Speakers
avatar for Perry Samson

Perry Samson

Professor, University of Michigan/Echo360
I am an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor at the University of Michigan in the Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences. I enjoy teaching and was honored in 2010 as “Distinguished Professor of the Year” by the President’s Council of Universities in the State of Michigan. My classes cover a range of topics from air quality and meteorology to ownership issues for entrepreneurs. I annually leads undergraduates on expeditions to study... Read More →


Thursday April 14, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am
Room T/U

10:00am

Graduate Students' Critical Thinking Skills: Effects of a Service-Learning Experience
April Garrity, Jan Bradshaw

Service-learning holds promise for helping develop critical thinking skills among college students. Reflective writing, a key component of service-learning experiences, is also tied to critical thinking skills. This presentation will focus on descriptions of a successful graduate level service-learning experience and the preliminary findings from data collected on reflective writings within that experience. Our findings suggest that students' involvement in service-learning led to increases in critical thinking skills. The service-learning experience will be discussed, along with the implications of our findings in light of the relationships between self reflection and critical thinking. This presentation is intended for those who are interested in the development of critical thinking skills and service-learning as a pedagogical approach in higher education.

Speakers
JB

Jan Bradshaw

Armstrong State University
avatar for April Garrity

April Garrity

Associate Professor and Clinic Coordinator, Armstrong State University


Thursday April 14, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am
Room Q

10:00am

Investigating the Benefits of Visual Python Computational Activities in Introductory Calculus Based Physics Course
Trinanjan Datta, Deborah Richardson

The objective of the presentation will be to share our findings about student perceptions of a hands-on computational approach to learning physics. Computation is the use of a computer to numerically solve, simulate, and visualize a physical problem. However, STEM majors enrolled in traditional introductory calculus based physics courses have minimal or zero exposure to computational physics tools and ideas. Our research study is motivated by the growing body of scientific literature from the physics education research community which is actively interested in assessing the potential benefits and or risks of implementing a computational physics environment in an introductory physics course. Using two surveys developed by our research team - Computational Physics Attitude Survey (CPAS) and VPython Attitude Survey (VPAS) - we have collected and analyzed student attitude towards learning and enjoyment of computation. We find that students expressed a positive attitude towards learning a physics concept, irrespective of whether they enjoyed the activity or not. The results will offer valuable guidance to the STEM community.

Speakers
TD

Trinanjan Datta

Augusta University
DR

Deborah Richardson

Director of Faculty Development, Augusta University


Thursday April 14, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am
Room L

10:00am

Students' Perceptions and Uses of Textbooks: Open-source, Electronic and Traditional
Brad Bailey, Tom Cooper

With the increasing costs of printed textbooks along with the increasing availability of open-educational resources (OER), faculty may be tempted to consider adopting open-access materials. But how do our students feel about these options? Does the format of the text influence how and how often the students use their textbooks? Are students using free or online texts just as satisfied with the quality of these resources as other students? The speakers administered an electronic survey to students in four introductory classes that included a range of questions including items that addressed the above research questions. In this presentation, the speakers will reveal and discuss the results of this survey.

Speakers
BB

Brad Bailey

University of North Georgia
TC

Tom Cooper

University of North Georgia


Thursday April 14, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am
Room K

10:00am

Thinking Critically About Learning: Engaging Students in Metacognitive Regulation Through Active Study Strategies
Aaron Beedle, Joan Monohan Watson

Just as we instruct students in the development of habits that encourage them to think critically about the content of our courses, we must also teach them to critically consider the ways in which they come to learn and to know new information. This "thinking about thinking" or "knowing about knowing" or, simply, metacognition, enables students to regulate their study behaviors by discerning and adopting strategies that are most impactful to their own learning. Appropriate for all faculty and administrators, this interactive session explores the development of metacognitive regulatory skills among third-year Human Physiology students through a three-fold intervention involving the use of active study strategies. The presenters will illustrate the impact of the intervention on the development of metacognitive regulation and the subsequent impact on student performance by sharing, discussing, and evaluating data collected throughout the semester.

Speakers
AB

Aaron Beedle

University of Georgia
avatar for Joan Monahan Watson

Joan Monahan Watson

University of Georgia


Thursday April 14, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am
Room R

10:00am

Writing Fellows: Using Embedded Tutors to Enhance Student Writing
Leigh Dillard, Kim Griffin, Laura Rosche, Jim Shimkus

From campus writing centers to online tutoring services, a range of options exist for students seeking assistance with writing assignments. While some modes rely on students to ask for help, others provide a more direct approach. Embedded tutor programs offer one alternative, implemented to improve student writing by placing tutors in closer proximity to students, resulting in a collaborative, active environment for learning. The Writing Fellows Program launched at the University of North Georgia creates a focused, peer-tutoring setting for students in writing-heavy courses. A discussion of this program reveals the experiences of its participants---organizers, a faculty implementer, student tutor, and student participant. This panel is intended not only for those interested in similar programs but also those engaged in collaborative models to improve active learning and communication.

Speakers
LD

Leigh Dillard

University of North Georgia
KG

Kim Griffin

University of North Georgia
LR

Laura Rosche

University of North Georgia
JS

Jim Shimkus

University of North Georgia


Thursday April 14, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am
Room F/G

11:00am

ALG Grantees Panel: STEM and OER: Strategies, Online Homework and Lab Solutions, and Effectiveness
ALG Panel Presentation

In this panel presentation Affordable Learning Georgia Grantees will discuss the following three projects and share their experiences in developing and using open and low cost textbooks and materials.


Use of Open Educational Resources in the Survey of Chemistry I Course (CHEM 1151)
 

Estelle Nuckels

General, Organic, and Biology (GOB) textbooks and online homework systems are costly, causing many students to forgo purchasing either or both. In an attempt to lower student costs, we have opted to use the OpenStax Chemistry textbook, a free online resource, with Sapling Learning, a lower cost online homework system. In this talk, we will discuss using a Principles of Chemistry textbook for the Survey of Chemistry I course, challenges that we have encountered, and student feedback. Reorganization of the material and strengthening the course curriculum to better support students entering the nursing program has also occurred. Lecture design hybridizes typical lecture with a flipped-classroom approach, drawing from the strengths of both teaching styles.


A Look at the Use and Effectiveness of OER in an Upper-Level Psychology Course
 

Judy Grissett

The purpose of this presentation is to describe one instructor's experience using open educational resources (OER) in an upper-level psychology research methods course (PSYC 4431: Experimental Psychology). The presenter will outline her experiences using an OER textbook and supplemental activities (e.g., homework and in-class activities), focusing on the 1) use and 2) effectiveness compared to a traditional publisher's textbook used the previous semester. Specifically, it will cover the selection and implementation of OER, a description of the materials used, and a report of students' grades and perceptions of the OER, such as their willingness to engage with the materials.


Teaching Calculus with OER, including WeBWorK
 

Shaun Ault

As part of the Affordable Learning Georgia Grant, the author and co-PI, Sudhir Goel, developed and used free open-access materials for the course Analytical Geometry & Calculus I at Valdosta State University. Two pilot courses were run with no-cost materials in Fall 2015, and results collected. This presentation focuses on the OER materials chosen and created for the pilot courses, including a library of WeBWorK problems modeled on exercises in a free textbook called APEX Calculus (ver. 3).

 

Moderators
avatar for Jeff Gallant

Jeff Gallant

ALG Visiting Program Officer for OER, University System of Georgia

Speakers
SA

Shaun Ault

Valdosta State University
avatar for Judy Grissett

Judy Grissett

Assistant Professor, Georgia Southwestern State University
EN

Estelle Nuckels

Middle Georgia State University


Thursday April 14, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room K

11:00am

Assessing the Development of Critical Thinking: An Undergraduate Political Science Course
Clemente Quinones

This research study focuses on assessing the development of critical thinking of students in POLS 2401-Current Global Issues. The general assumption is that students in this course in particular (and in other social science courses in general) develop a critical thinking/analysis (of global issues) as the course progresses. Based on this, the study focuses on explaining such a development. This study is of particular interest for college/university instructors (professors) who already use or are willing to use critical thinking in their teaching.

Speakers
CQ

Clemente Quinones

Assistant Professor, Georgia Gwinnett College


Thursday April 14, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room Q

11:00am

Driving Active Learning from the Superhighway to the Dead-End Road
Sara Selby, Molly Smith, Lisa Howel

Many of the current techniques for promoting engaged student learning rely on technology, and many institutions of higher learning are fortunate enough to have technologically advanced campus networks and highly skilled and motivated faculty members who embrace cutting-edge strategies. What happens, though, if the digital superhighway is full of potholes due to lack of funding? Or, what happens when the superhighway suddenly collapses altogether and technology fails completely? In this presentation, participants will review their own teaching styles; view multidiscipline demonstrations of how technology can be used to facilitate student engagement in any environment; and leave with a multitude of resources for designing active learning strategies suitable to their own academic disciplines. This presentation will be beneficial for anyone wishing to incorporate active learning strategies using current technology with limited resources.

Speakers
LH

Lisa Howell

South Georgia State College
avatar for Sara Selby

Sara Selby

Professor of English, South Georgia State College
MS

Molly Smith

Professor of Biology, South Georgia State College
I am a Professor of Biology using OER and various active learning strategies in my courses.


Thursday April 14, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room Y/Z

11:00am

Engaging Students in Online Courses: Alignment Matters
Kathy Dolan

Engaging online students in a meaningful way can be tricky. A well-designed and aligned course can make all the difference. In this interdisciplinary session we will explore the concept of alignment in online courses. We will discuss how course and module learning outcomes should be clear and measurable, how they should align with instructional materials, instructional design, and assessment, and how we can present this process to students in a helpful way. We will practice creating and evaluating meaningful, measurable course and module-level learning objectives. We will discuss ideas for accurately assessing learning outcomes- are we measuring what we say we want the students to learn? And we will share ideas for presenting materials and activities that support achievement of the stated learning outcomes. Participants will leave the session with a clear framework for strengthening alignment in their own courses.

Speakers
avatar for Kathy Dolan

Kathy Dolan

Department Chair, Perimeter College at GSU


Thursday April 14, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room V/W

11:00am

Pinterest as a Tool to Learn Spanish Culture
Alicia Arribas, Reilly Lerner, Katherine Rowland

This session will present a Pinterest project done in a face-to-face Spanish Literature and Culture course at the University of Georgia. The use of Pinterest helps to promote students' engagement with collaborative learning, enhances student cultural and language proficiency, encourages student-student and student-teacher interaction and brings authentic resources into the course. The presenter will be accompanied by students who will discuss their learning experiences with this social media tool. Pinterest can be used in online, blended and face-to-face courses.

Speakers
AA

Alicia Arribas

University of Georgia
RL

Reilly Lerner

University of Georgia
KR

Katherine Rowland

University of Georgia


Thursday April 14, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room T/U

11:00am

Tension: an essential agent of effective teaching
Larbi Oukada, Aran Mackinnon, Costas Spirou

The presentation considers the importance of tension as a catalyst for creating developmental change and traces its inevitability to a set of four teaching constraints that convert teaching into dueling confrontations (1) between the teacher's pursuit to understand knowledge and to represent it in an ontologically congruous manner and the endless possibilities of such a pursuit (epistemological constraint); (2) between the teacher's attempt to frame his or her accumulated understanding of the target knowledge into a relatively transmittable linguistic statement and the reality that language is an imperfect medium (semiotic constraint); (3) between the teacher's presentation and the apprehension that its organization might be grounded on a psychologically invalid premise (learning constraint); and (4), between the teacher's expected forward progress and the many reversionary forces exerted by local factors (environmental constraint).

Speakers
AM

Aran MacKinnon

Georgia College
LO

Larbi Oukada

Georgia College & State University
CS

Costas Spirou

Georgia College & State University


Thursday April 14, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room R

11:00am

A Collaborative Case Approach to Teach Information-Seeking and Information-Sharing
Thursday Morning Pecha Kucha Session
Presentation 4

Kim Green


In many problem-solving situations students encounter in their careers, they need information from a variety of sources within or outside their organization. Many cases used in class provide all of the information in one document. When all information is provided, no student gets the experience of identifying missing information and potential sources to fill the gaps. Students miss the collaborative nature of information-sharing and input from multiple areas of responsibility that is necessary for complex problem-solving. In this presentation, I describe the development of a simple collaborative case approach that works as a guided role play, and I present two examples. This approach helps the students learn to read with an eye toward what information is not there and the holes that are present in the information they possess. This topic is intended to be useful for classroom teachers and could be developed for both classroom and online exercises.

Speakers
KG

Kim Green

University of West Georgia


Thursday April 14, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room L

11:00am

Classroom Assessment Techniques - Effective Tools for Student Assessment and Feedback
Thursday Morning Pecha Kucha Session
Presentation 3

Leslie Ann Dunn


This presentation will give an overview of different classroom assessment techniques that can be used in the online or blended environment. Overview of different types of learning assignments, collaborative learning, and in-class assessments. Discussion of best practices for online feedback and engagement.

Speakers
LA

Leslie Ann Dunn

Georgia State University


Thursday April 14, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room L

11:00am

Fun, Free, Fabulous Online Tools That Are Sure To Engage Students
Thursday Morning Pecha Kucha Session
Presentation 5

Phyllis Snipes


A very solid strategy for getting students involved in online courses is through use of exciting and entertaining online tools. This session will provide examples of how free and exciting web 2.0 tools can be effectively used in the school and the workplace. Teachers and course designers will see examples of how to model the use of various free, engaging online tools in the virtual learning environment, and how they can be easily embedded into the D2L management system or linked through D2L.

Speakers
avatar for Phyllis Snipes

Phyllis Snipes

Associate Professor, University of West Georgia
I worked in P-12 schools as a kindergarten, first, and second grade classroom teacher for six years. I held the position of elementary, middle and high school media specialist in Georgia schools for ten years and received National Board Certification in Library Media status in 2002. I served on the Georgia Governor’s Information Technology Policy Council and was Media Coordinator for the Carrollton Georgia School District for 15 years. During... Read More →


Thursday April 14, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room L

11:00am

Keeping It Simple: Rethinking Classic Ideas to Engage the Modern Student
Thursday Morning Pecha Kucha Session
Presentation 2

Jeremy Petrella


In this talk we discuss basic methods of education that can work no matter the technology level. Instead of trying to reinvent the wheel we, as educators, can simply use technology to facilitate such classic styles as the socratic method, experiential learning, cooperative learning, peer teaching, and even class lectures. The idea of changing your pedagogy is daunting to many instructors, but hopefully they can learn that adapting their delivery does not have to change their style.

Speakers
JP

Jeremy Petrella

South Georgia State College


Thursday April 14, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room L

11:00am

The Technology Perfect Storm
Thursday Morning Pecha Kucha Session
Presentation 1

John Lowe


Higher education is being heavily impacted by a "perfect storm" of colliding factors involving academic technology and student behaviors. This infusion of technology is requiring faculty and academic leaders to rethink their strategies regarding the use and processes around technology in the teaching and learning mission.

Speakers
avatar for John Lowe

John Lowe

Manager Academic Partnerships, Echo360
I have been involved in representing academic technology companies since 1985, including Apple, HP, KPMG and WebCT. I have a strong interest in helping institutions positively impact their student's academic outcomes and success.


Thursday April 14, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room L

12:00pm