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USG Teaching and Learning Conference: Best Practices for Promoting Engaged Student Learning

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Concurrent Session [clear filter]
Wednesday, April 13
 

9:00am EDT

Creating a Living Learning Community to Promote Engaged Student Learning
Roberta Berry, William Berry, Joseph Levy, Hailey Loehde-Woolard, Benjamin Rapsas, Laura Winalski

Living learning communities (LLCs) can enhance learning across disciplines, foster holistic learning, and promote peer and faculty-student interaction. How can faculty and campus partners create an LLC that delivers these benefits? Building the LLC infrastructure requires cross-campus collaboration. Students, faculty, and other partners also must collaborate in sustaining and continuously improving an LLC whose members are strongly tied together and in which the benefits of an LLC, in fact, are realized. An LLC director will describe building an infrastructure tailored to students who share an inquiry-driven approach to learning. Students will describe the LLC's benefits and most effective aspects and their partnership in sustaining and improving the LLC. Presenters will participate with audience groups in imagining the design of an LLC, followed by discussion and questions.

Speakers
RB

Roberta Berry

Georgia Institute of Technology
WB

William Berry

Georgia Institute of Technology
JL

Joseph Levy

Georgia Institute of Technology
HL

Hailey Loehde-Woolard

Georgia Institute of Technology
BR

Benjamin Rapsas

Georgia Institute of Technology
LW

Laura Winalski

Georgia Institute of Technology


Wednesday April 13, 2016 9:00am - 9:45am EDT
Room F/G

10:00am EDT

Making It Real: Putting Life into the Lived Spaces of the Past
Glenda Swan

This session presents some of the approaches and activities used to engage students in the study of domestic architecture as part of an upper-division topics course in Art History on the ancient Roman city of Pompeii. Students were transformed into "Century 1" Real Estate Agent Trainees and, after learning about the ideal Roman house plan, explored the non-ideal residential environments that Pompeians actually occupied. Real houses and archaeological data were used to create oral and written "realtor reports" that emphasized the good - and underplayed the negative - features of actual houses from the region. Students also made proposals to imagined house-builders about the best way to design and decorate houses for irregular and/or small plots of land that I adapted from actual Pompeian homes. Through these activities, students were able to relate the space, decor and social use of these ancient spaces with their own experiences of modern environments.

Speakers
GS

Glenda Swan

Valdosta State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am EDT
Room F/G

10:00am EDT

Reframing Student Engagement: Creating a Supportive Learning Environment and Increasing Active Learning in Face-to-Face, Blended, and Online Courses
Cher Hendricks, Beth Rene' Roepnack

For students to be active, engaged learners, faculty need to create a supportive learning environment that encourages students to engage with course materials, reflect on their learning, and engage with others as they learn new concepts and skills. Whether you are teaching face-to-face, blended, or online, this interactive, hands-on session will provide a number of strategies to encourage students’ active learning with materials, with others, and with their own learning. Following best practices for engaged learning, participants will work collaboratively to develop activities that increase student engagement—beyond in-class and online discussions—that they can implement in their own courses and that are aligned to student learning outcomes. To get the most benefit from this session, participants are encouraged to bring a course syllabus or student learning outcome to share and discuss as we consider ways to help students actively engage in their learning.

Speakers
avatar for Cher Hendricks

Cher Hendricks

University of West Georgia
avatar for Beth René Roepnack

Beth René Roepnack

Online Faculty Mentor, USG eCampus
I think that online discussions, done well, are the heart of any online course. However, I would love to learn about alternatives that maintain a sense of engagement and community while encouraging learning.


Wednesday April 13, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am EDT
Room T/U

3:00pm EDT

Community Health Issues: A Model for Collaborative Performative Engagement
Karen Berman, Kristi Papailler

Utilizing local spaces in the community and community member interaction, students in Georgia College Theatre for Social Change classes and their partners in Early College, a program for at-risk teens, collaborate in active student engagement on health issues to create best practices for promoting engaged student learning. From performances at museums on the topic of race and education such as the Sallie Ellis Davis House, where an early 1900s African-American teacher began a local school, to out-of-doors performances at the Clothesline Project to advocate against violence against women, a diverse group of students engage members of the community to participate in solving social issues. The students themselves will demonstrate the product of this unique scholarship of teaching and learning method. Portfolio assessments of critical thinking are explored.This program will be helpful for students in and professors in all disciplines interested in community interactive engagement.

Speakers
KB

Karen Berman

Georgia College, 922
KP

Kristi Papailler

Georgia College & State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 3:00pm - 3:45pm EDT
Room F/G

4:00pm EDT

Engaged Student Learning through Course-Based Experiences: Identifying Impact
Kyle Frantz, Cheri Kersey

xperiential learning is a classic approach to student engagement, based in experience, reflection, and application. At Georgia State University, over 350 'signature experience' courses offer experiential learning in formats such as field studies, internships, clinical rotations, student teaching, and service learning. Identifying the impact of experiential learning across an institution is a challenge, one that requires a multifaceted approach. For example, institutional research can test for contributions to academic trajectories or correlation with student competencies. Surveys can quantify student assessment of their own learning. Individual interviews can describe the experiences and effects. Outcomes at Georgia State confirm that students identify gains in critical thinking, communication, networking, and career goals. Based on impact analysis, developing value propositions for students, faculty, and staff may be critical to enhancing course-based experiential learning.

Speakers
KF

Kyle Frantz

Georgia State University
CK

Cheri Kersey

Georgia State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 4:00pm - 4:45pm EDT
Room F/G
 
Thursday, April 14
 

8:00am EDT

What Students Want: Collision or Collaboration in the Multimodal Classroom?
Jo Anne Harris, Gina Foster, Elizabeth Vance

In an age in which technology changes at light speeds, pedagogies have become kaleidoscopes of shifting, adapting, and sometimes colliding methods for teaching students who are multi-cultural, multi-technological, multi-generational, multi-gender . . . multi-everything. This begs the question of how to bring order to a disorderly space in which "differentiation" has become a buzzword for providing students with individualized pedagogical space to explore their individual multiplicities. In order to answer this question and provide attendees a collaborative model for engaging students, this session is led by a team of three presenters, two students and the instructor of an upper level English Literature course required for Teacher Certification. By focusing on the use of multimodality and active learning techniques we provide attendees with three different perspectives for scaffolding texts and technology using techniques that work well for any discipline.

Speakers
GF

Gina Foster

Georgia Gwinnett College
JA

Jo Anne Harris

Georgia Gwinnett College
EV

Elizabeth Vance

Georgia Gwinnett College


Thursday April 14, 2016 8:00am - 8:45am EDT
Room T/U

10:00am EDT

Writing Fellows: Using Embedded Tutors to Enhance Student Writing
Leigh Dillard, Kim Griffin, Laura Rosche, Jim Shimkus

From campus writing centers to online tutoring services, a range of options exist for students seeking assistance with writing assignments. While some modes rely on students to ask for help, others provide a more direct approach. Embedded tutor programs offer one alternative, implemented to improve student writing by placing tutors in closer proximity to students, resulting in a collaborative, active environment for learning. The Writing Fellows Program launched at the University of North Georgia creates a focused, peer-tutoring setting for students in writing-heavy courses. A discussion of this program reveals the experiences of its participants---organizers, a faculty implementer, student tutor, and student participant. This panel is intended not only for those interested in similar programs but also those engaged in collaborative models to improve active learning and communication.

Speakers
LD

Leigh Dillard

Associate Professor of English, University of North Georgia
KG

Kim Griffin

University of North Georgia
LR

Laura Rosche

University of North Georgia
JS

Jim Shimkus

University of North Georgia


Thursday April 14, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am EDT
Room F/G