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USG Teaching and Learning Conference: Best Practices for Promoting Engaged Student Learning

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Concurrent Session [clear filter]
Wednesday, April 13
 

9:00am EDT

Moving Out of the Classroom with Field-Based Student Consulting Projects
Kirk Heriot, John Finley

Kirk Heriot, John Finley The purpose of this session is to describe a unique active learning pedagogy we use. Micro Student Consulting Projects" are an alternative to traditional active learning experiences. In our session, we describe how we take students outside the classroom to complete "consulting" projects for local organizations, both businesses and not-for-profit organizations. We will also describe the process we use to administer our program. Lastly, we will present examples of student projects and address how variations of student consulting projects might be used by faculty in other academic disciplines."

Speakers
JF

John Finley

Columbus State University
KH

Kirk Heriot

Columbus State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 9:00am - 9:45am EDT
Room R

10:00am EDT

Using Dichotomous Meaning Dimensions to Cultivate Students' Critical Thinking Skills
Joseph Mayo

Teaching undergraduate classes presents special challenges. In addition to covering much content in an organized manner, instructors attempt to stimulate critical thinking and student engagement in learning. To accomplish these goals, an innovative and evidence-based pedagogical strategy that I have found effective highlights dichotomous meaning dimensions within the framework of personal construct theory (PCT). Personal constructs are hierarchically linked sets of bipolar meaning dimensions (e.g., central-peripheral) that each person uses to interpret knowledge. Based on my own previously published reports in which I systematically validate the pedagogical efficacy of applying PCT, I will summarize my instructional methodologies and findings in teaching life-span development and the history of psychology. I will conclude by discussing implications of using PCT as a heuristic and assessment tool in interdisciplinary and other undergraduate classes outside of the psychology discipline.

Speakers
JM

Joseph Mayo

Gordon State College


Wednesday April 13, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am EDT
Room Q

11:00am EDT

Opening the Classroom Door: A Hands-On Approach to Study Abroad Programs
Elissa Auerbach, Stephen Auerbach, Craig Pascoe

This session features two innovative study abroad programs that utilize a blended learning experience which promotes critical thinking skills. These programs emphasize hands-on learning opportunities only possible through study abroad while providing the equivalent content knowledge students encounter in an online course. The first is an interdisciplinary program in Amsterdam and Paris examining the art history and history of the Netherlands and France from early modernity to the present; the second in Florence and Tuscany explores Italian foodways and culture. The audience will engage with a former student about her project on a major funerary monument in Delft that culminated in a scholarly research paper. The audience will also participate in an olive oil tasting that illuminates an Italian community's history and culture. Although the programs are focused primarily on art, history, and culture the model can easily be implemented in other disciplines.

Speakers
SA

Stephen Auerbach

Georgia College & State University
avatar for Elissa Auerbach

Elissa Auerbach

Associate Professor, Department of Art, Georgia College
Associate Professor of art history with a specialization in seventeenth-century Dutch and Flemish art. I teach courses in Renaissance and Baroque art history, introductory art history, Art and Ideas, and Writing about Art. I also direct a summer study abroad program in Amsterdam and... Read More →
CP

Craig Pascoe

Georgia College & State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am EDT
Room Q

3:00pm EDT

CANCELLED - Finding New Perspectives: The Transformative Power of Service-Learning in Higher Education
Maya Clark

Universities seek to provide graduates transformative learning experiences to facilitate both lifelong learning and the acquisition of career-related knowledge. This presentation will describe the use of service learning as a transformative learning tool which integrates discipline specific learning objectives, practical experience, and structured opportunities for students to think critically. Reflective student writings and surveys associated with a service learning experience designed to promote literacy development in economically disadvantaged communities will be discussed. Results suggest service learning provided an opportunity for students to think critically while engaged in team-oriented experiences, widen cultural perspectives, and value community involvement. This presentation is intended for individuals interested in promoting active learning, cultural competence, and civic responsibility within the university curriculum.

Speakers
MC

Maya Clark

Armstrong State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 3:00pm - 3:45pm EDT
Room V/W

3:00pm EDT

Experiencing Undergraduate Student Research: Active Collaboration and Engagement
Danilo Baylen, Kendal Lucas, Runeshia Parker

This panel presentation focuses on the successful experience of undergraduate students as participants in a research and mentoring project. The faculty facilitator will describe the design and management of the experience including initial challenges. The student panelists will discuss their profiles (knowledge and skills sets), individual projects and outcomes (presentations and publications), and insights in becoming researchers, critical thinkers, and active and engaged collaborators. They will also share stories about personal growth and decision-making towards potential professional career paths. This session will benefit those interested in mentoring undergraduate students in co-producing scholarly works and will provide opportunities for the audience to share their own experiences in working with undergraduate students as well as viewpoints in socializing them to the research process.

Speakers
DB

Danilo Baylen

Professor, University of West Georgia
KL

Kendal Lucas

University of West Georgia
RP

Runeshia Parker

University of West Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 3:00pm - 3:45pm EDT
Room R

3:00pm EDT

YouTube University: Fostering Intellectual Curiosity and Critical Thinking with Online Media
Natalie James

Online multimedia texts such as YouTube videos, TED talks, and Podcasts are not only free and engaging for students, they can also model "popular intellectualism," curiosity, cultural criticism, and information literacy. This presentation demonstrates how to effectively use online multimedia to model critical engagement in a variety of disciplines.

Speakers
avatar for Natalie James

Natalie James

Lecturer, Georgia Southern University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 3:00pm - 3:45pm EDT
Room T/U

4:00pm EDT

College on the Move: Hands on Learning
Niels Eichhorn

This presentation is based on my experiences with an experimental summer travel course in which students were on the road for 16 days and visited a series of historical locations in Georgia, Tennessee, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Alabama. The presentation will show the importance of hands on learning. Students gained a better appreciation for the topography of battlefield in the outcome of fights, why battles were fought in certain places, and how southern plantations worked during the antebellum years. Even more, students learned about new job opportunities within museums, historic sites, and with the National Park Service. While a long 16-day trip might be beyond the capacity of many students and professors, classes can engage in small daylong fieldtrips to gain at least a basic appreciation and provide knowledge impossible to convey in a conventional classroom.

Speakers
NE

Niels Eichhorn

Middle Georgia State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 4:00pm - 4:45pm EDT
Room R

4:00pm EDT

Critical Thinking and Social Coding: Killing Two Birds with One Stone
Laura Hanna

This presentation stems from a frustration with students' decreasing ability to heed social cues in professional settings (such as standing up and shaking the mayor's hand when he walks into the room) and an attempt to help students remedy that lack through exercises in critical thinking and role playing in the classroom. Using Louis Althusser's theories about the social constructions of meaning and behavior (including ideological state apparatuses) to undergird the theoretical aspects of the presentation, I argue for the importance of teaching students how to respond to different social situations and how to connect this lesson back to understanding the importance of making meaning from social contexts, which ultimately strengthens students' critical thinking skills and propensity for success in the real world. This presentation provides attendees with some concrete ideas for classroom discussions and scenarios for successful interactions that can be implemented in any classroom.

Speakers
avatar for Laura Hanna

Laura Hanna

Valdosta State University
Laura Hanna advises honors students at Valdosta State University's Honors College and is earning a doctorate in education at the same institution. She also teaches English at Wiregrass Georgia Technical College. Laura's previous degrees are in English literature; she holds an MA... Read More →


Wednesday April 13, 2016 4:00pm - 4:45pm EDT
Room L

4:00pm EDT

Student Well-Being Matters: Towards a Balanced Interactive Model of Teaching and Learning Process
Barbara Karwacinski

Positive psychological functioning in a social context is an important factor for students' academic and personal success. There are two main theoretical perspectives, which focus on addressing the questions of what makes people feel good and happy. Hedonic well-being is based on the notion that increased pleasure and decreased pain lead to happiness. Eudaimonic well-being, on the other hand, is based on the premise that people feel happy if they experience life purpose, challenges, and growth. From this perspective, by engaging students in eudaimonic pursuits, subjective well-being will occur as a by product of the development of individual strengths and virtues. Seventy-four undergraduate sociology students at Southwestern Michigan College learn and apply principles of eudaimonic well- being during the Spring Semester of 2016. Samples of students' work will be presented and discussed.

Speakers
BK

Barbara Karwacinski

Southwestern Michigan College


Wednesday April 13, 2016 4:00pm - 4:45pm EDT
Room Q
 
Thursday, April 14
 

8:00am EDT

Highly Engaged Learning - How Can We Make It Happen?
Julie Hentges, Elizabeth Dierking, Lesi Smart

During this session, presenters will provide student engagement techniques to encourage constructive time on task behavior. Conference attendees interested in promoting critical thinking and student engagement will appreciate the organized format of this session. Conference members will be encouraged to be active participants in this setting. The structured format of the session is designed to promote critical thinking which will enhance student engagement and achievement. Purposefully, the objective of this workshop is to provide conference attendees with solid take-away strategies; such as, total participation techniques appropriate for application in their classroom setting.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Dierking

Elizabeth Dierking

Instructor, University of Central Missouri
30+ years as an elementary teacher and 5 years as an instructor at UCM. Literacy coach and beginning teacher program facilitator. Training includes reading and writing workshop as well as presenter for using interactive graphic organizers as an instructional strategy.
avatar for Dr. Julie Hentges

Dr. Julie Hentges

Associate Professor, University of Central Missouri
Dr. Julie Hentges, Associate Professor, University of Central, MO (UCM) is a certified teacher and a certified K-12 reading specialist in Missouri. Dr. Hentges holds a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in Education as well as an earned Doctorate with an emphasis in teacher education... Read More →
LS

Lesi Smart

University of Central Missouri


Thursday April 14, 2016 8:00am - 8:45am EDT
Room Q

9:00am EDT

Isn't it Just a Story? Promoting Critical Thinking in Psychology through Community Engaged Learning with StoryCorps
Christina Grange, Dianna King, Ryan Smith, Jasmine Threatt

Public media provides exciting opportunities to bring the diverse complexities of the world to the psychology classroom. It can challenge students to apply psychological concepts to a range of global and individual experiences. StoryCorps (www.storycorps.org) is one public media production that can aid in this effort using an instructional paradigm grounded in community, cooperation, and applied learning. This conference presentation will be an exemplar of this approach, demonstrating how students are guided to work in groups to develop multi-media projects reflecting their understanding of psychological concepts applied to StoryCorps stories. Student perspectives will be integrated into the presentation to reflect perceived illuminate benefits and challenges present when using public media as a stool for teaching and learning. Finally, audience members will be invited to participate in exchanges about how public media can creatively be integrated into a range of content areas.

Speakers
CG

Christina Grange

Clayton State University
DK

Dianna King

Clayton State University
RS

Ryan Smith

Clayton State University
JT

Jasmine Threatt

Clayton State University


Thursday April 14, 2016 9:00am - 9:45am EDT
Room Q

9:00am EDT

Modeling Critical Thinking in Asynchronous Discussion Forums
Justin Garcia

This presentation will introduce a model of critical thinking and demonstrate how professors can use it to model critical thinking in online asynchronous discussion forums. Learning goals for this session include: (1) Understand the model of critical thinking, (2) Exemplify the “moves" of the professor in an asynchronous discussion forum guided by the model of critical thinking and (3) Recognize how to ask questions that encourage students to recognize the patterns of their thinking, that is, the inherent assumptions in their thinking, the implications that follow from their thinking, and the clarity of their thinking. In this session attendees will have 3-4 opportunities to discuss and practice the concepts and techniques.

Speakers
avatar for Justin Garcia

Justin Garcia

Professor and Department Chair, DeVry University, Fresno California


Thursday April 14, 2016 9:00am - 9:45am EDT
Room L

9:00am EDT

This will NOT be on a test: Meditation and Maintaining Student (and Faculty) Self-care
Marquita Jackson-Minot, Gissia De Moya, Cristina Pinheiro

This interactive presentation is for anyone who experiences stress in his or her life. The following questions will be addressed: What are the largest stressors college students face, what are effective ways that instructors can help students handle stress, and do techniques such as exercise, deep breathing, and meditation assigned in a specific course during a semester help decrease student stress? During this presentation preservice teachers will discuss ways in which participating in specific relaxation techniques influenced their stress levels as related to their general self-care. Participants will create an interactive graphic organizer based upon the information garnered in the presentation.

Speakers
MJ

Marquita Jackson-Minot

Georgia Gwinnett College
GD

Gissia De Moya

Georgia Gwinnett College
CP

Cristina Pinheiro

Georgia Gwinnett College


Thursday April 14, 2016 9:00am - 9:45am EDT
Room R

10:00am EDT

Graduate Students' Critical Thinking Skills: Effects of a Service-Learning Experience
April Garrity, Jan Bradshaw

Service-learning holds promise for helping develop critical thinking skills among college students. Reflective writing, a key component of service-learning experiences, is also tied to critical thinking skills. This presentation will focus on descriptions of a successful graduate level service-learning experience and the preliminary findings from data collected on reflective writings within that experience. Our findings suggest that students' involvement in service-learning led to increases in critical thinking skills. The service-learning experience will be discussed, along with the implications of our findings in light of the relationships between self reflection and critical thinking. This presentation is intended for those who are interested in the development of critical thinking skills and service-learning as a pedagogical approach in higher education.

Speakers
JB

Jan Bradshaw

Armstrong State University
avatar for April Garrity

April Garrity

Associate Professor and Clinic Coordinator, Armstrong State University


Thursday April 14, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am EDT
Room Q

10:00am EDT

Investigating the Benefits of Visual Python Computational Activities in Introductory Calculus Based Physics Course
Trinanjan Datta, Deborah Richardson

The objective of the presentation will be to share our findings about student perceptions of a hands-on computational approach to learning physics. Computation is the use of a computer to numerically solve, simulate, and visualize a physical problem. However, STEM majors enrolled in traditional introductory calculus based physics courses have minimal or zero exposure to computational physics tools and ideas. Our research study is motivated by the growing body of scientific literature from the physics education research community which is actively interested in assessing the potential benefits and or risks of implementing a computational physics environment in an introductory physics course. Using two surveys developed by our research team - Computational Physics Attitude Survey (CPAS) and VPython Attitude Survey (VPAS) - we have collected and analyzed student attitude towards learning and enjoyment of computation. We find that students expressed a positive attitude towards learning a physics concept, irrespective of whether they enjoyed the activity or not. The results will offer valuable guidance to the STEM community.

Speakers
TD

Trinanjan Datta

Augusta University
DR

Deborah Richardson

Director of Faculty Development, Augusta University


Thursday April 14, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am EDT
Room L

10:00am EDT

Thinking Critically About Learning: Engaging Students in Metacognitive Regulation Through Active Study Strategies
Aaron Beedle, Joan Monohan Watson

Just as we instruct students in the development of habits that encourage them to think critically about the content of our courses, we must also teach them to critically consider the ways in which they come to learn and to know new information. This "thinking about thinking" or "knowing about knowing" or, simply, metacognition, enables students to regulate their study behaviors by discerning and adopting strategies that are most impactful to their own learning. Appropriate for all faculty and administrators, this interactive session explores the development of metacognitive regulatory skills among third-year Human Physiology students through a three-fold intervention involving the use of active study strategies. The presenters will illustrate the impact of the intervention on the development of metacognitive regulation and the subsequent impact on student performance by sharing, discussing, and evaluating data collected throughout the semester.

Speakers
AB

Aaron Beedle

University of Georgia
avatar for Joan Monahan Watson

Joan Monahan Watson

University of Georgia


Thursday April 14, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am EDT
Room R

11:00am EDT

Assessing the Development of Critical Thinking: An Undergraduate Political Science Course
Clemente Quinones

This research study focuses on assessing the development of critical thinking of students in POLS 2401-Current Global Issues. The general assumption is that students in this course in particular (and in other social science courses in general) develop a critical thinking/analysis (of global issues) as the course progresses. Based on this, the study focuses on explaining such a development. This study is of particular interest for college/university instructors (professors) who already use or are willing to use critical thinking in their teaching.

Speakers
CQ

Clemente Quinones

Assistant Professor, Georgia Gwinnett College


Thursday April 14, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am EDT
Room Q

11:00am EDT

Tension: an essential agent of effective teaching
Larbi Oukada, Aran Mackinnon, Costas Spirou

The presentation considers the importance of tension as a catalyst for creating developmental change and traces its inevitability to a set of four teaching constraints that convert teaching into dueling confrontations (1) between the teacher's pursuit to understand knowledge and to represent it in an ontologically congruous manner and the endless possibilities of such a pursuit (epistemological constraint); (2) between the teacher's attempt to frame his or her accumulated understanding of the target knowledge into a relatively transmittable linguistic statement and the reality that language is an imperfect medium (semiotic constraint); (3) between the teacher's presentation and the apprehension that its organization might be grounded on a psychologically invalid premise (learning constraint); and (4), between the teacher's expected forward progress and the many reversionary forces exerted by local factors (environmental constraint).

Speakers
AM

Aran MacKinnon

Georgia College
LO

Larbi Oukada

Georgia College & State University
CS

Costas Spirou

Georgia College & State University


Thursday April 14, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am EDT
Room R