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USG Teaching and Learning Conference: Best Practices for Promoting Engaged Student Learning

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Poster Session [clear filter]
Wednesday, April 13
 

5:00pm EDT

P01-Non-Tenure-Track STEM Faculty: Support and Rewards Systems
Dabney Dixon

For many academic institutions in the United States, the faculty model is increasingly differentiated, with different faculty members having different responsibilities and time commitments. Ehrenberg reports that non-tenure-track (NTT) faculty increased between 1995 and 2007 from 24% to 35% at public doctoral institutions and from 18% to 46% at private non-profit doctoral institutions (Ehrenberg, J. Econ. Perspect., 2012, 193-206). For many institutions, supporting NTT STEM Faculty is key to institutional success. We outline some of the current national data on NTT performance in the classroom. We also look at structural ways to provide resources to enhance NTT faculty personal development, professional advancement, research productivity, mentoring skills, and opportunities for innovation.

Speakers
DD

Dabney Dixon

Georgia State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P02-You Want Me to Do What?? Strategies For Addressing Resistance in the Flipped Classroom
Michelle Dykes, Joy Humphrey

As knowledge becomes more abundant than the time allowed to teach it, new strategies must be incorporated into higher education. In the past few years the term "flipped" has become a very popular word in higher education. As a result, there is no shortage of ideas and opinions about flipped learning environments. While many faculty and students have embraced this concept, others have met this new approach with various levels of resistance. This presentation will address various reasons for faculty and student resistance to the flipped classroom method as well as strategies for addressing this resistance.

Speakers
avatar for Michelle Dykes

Michelle Dykes

Georgia Southwestern State University
JH

Joy Humphrey

Georgia Southwestern State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P03-Using Strategic Partnerships to Maximize Critical Thinking and Creating Collaborations
Joy Humphrey, Michelle Dykes

Because of limited budgets and faculty shortage, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) has recommended the use of strategic partnerships between hospitals and nursing schools. These partnerships offer opportunities to create a highly educated nursing workforce, bridge the faculty shortage gap, and strengthen clinical connections with area healthcare agencies. This presentation will discuss a recently initiated strategic partnership aimed at educating senior nursing students in hands-on advanced cardiac life support (ACLS). A one-day, clinical simulation, facilitated by healthcare agency nurse educators, ACLS instructors, and nursing faculty, is provided to allow students a hands-on experience with witnessing, running, and participating in a code blue situation. Future plans for this collaboration, including facilitating continuing education of healthcare agency employees, will also be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Michelle Dykes

Michelle Dykes

Georgia Southwestern State University
JH

Joy Humphrey

Georgia Southwestern State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P04-Assessing Student Preparedness for Writing in the Sciences: A Case Study from a Joint Undergraduate/Graduate Ecology Course
Kaitlin Farrell

Instructors expect that by the time students enroll in 4000/6000 level science courses, they will have experience in scientific writing. As a result, assignments in upper-level science courses may focus on high-stakes written products without determining whether students have the skills needed to successfully complete the assignments. We studied students enrolled in a 4000/6000 level Ecology course to assess the skills that students have upon entering the class (i.e., previously learned skills), the effectiveness of low-stakes course activities in increasing student preparedness for and success in completing summative assignments, and student perceptions of the effectiveness of course activities in preparing them for success on assignments. Understanding how prior student learning experiences do or do not match instructor perceptions of student preparedness for different types of assignments will help maximize student engagement and success in writing in higher-level science courses.

Speakers
KF

Kaitlin Farrell

University of Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P05-Mark Twain and his 'Fable' on Critical Reading
Jason Horn

Showing how a dramatic reading can work to engage students in both reading and writing in composition classes, this presentation offers a review of a course focused on a short tale of Mark Twain's: "A Fable." While dramatically reading Twain's tale about stubborn and argumentative animals, students actively participate in debate as they defend their given animal roles and analyze and evaluate the viewpoints of other characters. This active reading prepares students to analyze and evaluate further readings and their own compositions.

Speakers
JH

Jason Horn

Professor of English, Gordon State College


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P06-Evaluating Honors Program Requirements in Response to Student Needs and Preferences
Matthew Horton, Katherine Kipp

This poster will present findings from surveys administered to Honors Program students enrolled at a two-year, access-oriented, commuter campus of a larger university in order to measure their perceptions of course delivery and program requirements. The presenters developed these surveys in response to low program retention and student frustrations related to time commitment. Based on the data, pathways are suggested for helping these students maximize the academic benefits of Honors Program participation, especially the importance of undergraduate research initiatives that foster critical thinking skills. Attendees will be encouraged to exchange ideas about Honors curriculum, undergraduate research support and scaffolding, and building campus community around academic excellence. Despite its emphasis on Honors Program administration, this poster will be helpful to any faculty or staff looking for strategies that enhance student learning at a variety of institution types.

Speakers
MH

Matthew Horton

University of North Georgia
KK

Katherine Kipp

University of North Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P07-Taking Pre-calculus Class In A Community College Can Be More Cost Effective
Wanjun Hu, Li Feng

From the student's perspective, pre-calculus classes are hard for three reasons: (1) there are so many scattered math concepts and calculations, (2) the professors are not teaching in the students' comfortable way, (3) the textbook is expensive but not helpful. Taking students' concerns into consideration, we provide a pamphlet of about 16 topics. For each topic, we define the algebraic form (what one can write down in Mathematics). Then, we explain its geometric meaning (what one can see). Finally, we list some types of problems and ways to solve them. To facilitate students' learning, we provide a copy of free textbook chapter from OpenStax, and a sample test, so that students can prepare for tests and exams with targets. For a comparison, two sections are taught with one using this new strategy and one using traditional way. Our results show that no significant difference between them in terms of students' performance.

Speakers
LF

Li Feng

Albany State University
WH

Wanjun Hu

Albany State University
Albany State UniversityContributed Paper-FacultyTechnologyHow much does touch screen technology help under-prepared students in science and math classes?Teaching mathematics and sciences using touch screen technology has been introduced to many classrooms. However, our study shows... Read More →


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P08-Faculty Perceptions of INQR 1000 Student Learning: Are They Engaged or Just Flirting?
Elizabeth Huggins

INQR 1000 is a discussion-based course designed to encourage first and second year students to use active learning and critical inquiry to create questions about a particular topic of interest and present their findings in an academic EXPO. Over 1000 undergraduate students have reported their success in developing the INQR 1000 skills which include: asking relevant questions; collecting appropriate resources; engaging in positive and meaningful discussions; contributing effectively to a group. We recently asked INQR faculty how they perceived students' development in terms of the learning outcomes. What resulted was surprising. This presentation would be ideal for audiences interested in student-directed learning, and the impact of faculty-student interaction for achieving learning outcomes. It would also be relevant for professionals interested in developing a topic-driven critical thinking course for undergraduate students.

Speakers
EH

Elizabeth Huggins

Director of First & Second Year Experiences, Augusta University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P09-Effect of Nanoparticles on Brine Shrimps - A Course Embedded Model to Integrate Research Based Projects into the Science Curriculum
ByungHoon Kim, Anta'Sha Jones, Louise Wrensford

Many institutions incorporate research activities into the undergraduate curriculum with known positive outcomes. We developed a way to incorporate a series of research projects with a common theme in various science courses that are vertically aligned. Through courses from freshmen to senior years, students are exposed to specially designed research projects related to nanotechnology. Here, we report a remodeling of a General Biology Lab course for Biology majors. In contrast to traditional lab activities, our course material includes a four-week research project, Effect of Nanoparticles on Brine Shrimps. Through this inquiry-based project, students design, execute and analyze data in an experiment to test the toxicity of silver nanoparticles using brine shrimps. We discuss the improvement of students learning outcome and their behavioral change toward science. Intended audience is high school and college level science educators. Supported by NSF Targeted Infusion Grant #HRD-1436265

Speakers
AJ

Anta'Sha Jones

Albany State University
BK

ByungHoon Kim

Albany State University
LW

Louise Wrensford

Albany State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P10-Enhancing Students' Engagement, Confidence, and Performance Through the Half-Semester Research-Based Laboratory
Yong Jin Lee

Typical science curricula use traditional cookbooks for the laboratory courses, which may result in students' lack of understanding of science in those courses. To address this problem and to enhance students' hands-on experience and critical thinking, the half-semester research-based laboratory was implemented in a microbiology course. After learning basic microbiological techniques, students explored a research topic by submitting a research proposal, conducting a research independently, and submitting a final report. Based on the pre- and post-lab exams, students did not show significant improvement after the research activity; however, the post-survey found that students clearly showed more positive attitudes toward the course and high confidence in laboratory tasks. During the presentation, the structure and components of research-based laboratory will be discussed and the outcomes will be shared with the audience who want to implement research-based activity in their courses.

Speakers
YJ

Yong Jin Lee

Albany State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P11-Helping STEM Students Find a Sense of Belongingness and Stay Excited about Their Studies
Margie Lewkowicz, Brooke Skelton

Georgia Perimeter College's Educate and Nurture Leadership in STEM (ENLISTEM) Scholars Program, funded by an NSF S-STEM grant, has found that an extra-curricular program combining opportunities for students to interact with STEM experts, and lead children in STEM activities helps collegiate STEM students find a sense of belongingness that encourages their persistence through the rigor of STEM coursework. ENLISTEM Scholars receive financial support, but we have found great benefit to ENLISTEM Scholars through field trips to businesses that employ STEM professionals and speakers that present novel opportunities and/or real-world advice. In addition, ENLISTEM Scholars find serving the community by inspiring young children to discover the wonders of math and science very rewarding. The purpose of this poster is to share the experience of the ENLISTEM Scholars Program so other schools can implement practices that excite students with little financial investment.

Speakers
ML

Margie Lewkowicz

Georgia State University
BS

Brooke Skelton

Georgia State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P12-Increasing Self-Regulated Learning in the Millennial Classroom
Jessica McCain, Michelle vanDellen

College teachers are increasingly concerned about a lack of self-regulation in Millennial students. We tested an intervention to increase self-regulated learning in 71 undergraduate students from a psychology statistics course. At the beginning and end of the semester, we measured narcissism, entitlement, external locus of control, helicopter parenting, achievement goal orientation, and several study strategies and beliefs about learning using the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ). Half of the participants received the intervention first, while the other participants completed practice problems. At midterm, all participants switched conditions. For the intervention, participants completed a worksheet each week identifying a problem area in the material and making a plan to address this area in the coming week. The group receiving the intervention first earned significantly higher final grades. Mediation analyses suggest that a decrease in external locus of control drove this difference.

Speakers
JM

Jessica McCain

University of Georgia
MV

Michelle vanDellen

University of Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P13-Development of a Biology Resource Center
Jeanelle Morgan

The development of a Biology Resource Center will provide innovative tools for student success and foster a sense of community for biology students. This will bring together students from different years, classes, and interests, promoting a sense of ownership and inclusion. The resources will aid students as they prepare for exams, internships, and conferences and will help promote high impact practices. High impact practices such as experimental design and problem solving, rigorous data analysis and interpretation, writing and speaking across the curriculum among others can be utilized and honed. An innovative inclusion will be workshops on topics of interest to biology students. With this project, students will have the opportunity to gain leadership experience as peer tutors and peer mentors. This poster will discuss the planning and initial implementation of this project.

Speakers
JM

Jeanelle Morgan

Assoc. Dept. Head/Professor, University of North Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P14-The 'Write' Stuff: Promoting Critical Thinking with Student-Authored Reading Cards
Katherine Perrotta

This session illustrates how to promote engagement and critical thinking about course readings with student authored reading cards. Students were assigned to write questions about assigned chapters from the course text. The presenter will describe the process in which the reading cards were assigned, and how to use the reading cards as discussion prompts, debate topics, and short-answer options for course assessments. The presenter will provide index cards and sample readings for participants to try the activity and discuss how they can adapt this activity for their own classes.

Speakers
KP

Katherine Perrotta

Kennesaw State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P15-Development of Inquiry Based Labs in Introductory Non- Major Biology Course
Linda Purvis, Swapna Bhat

Our current non-majors introductory biology course laboratory material has become very passive for student learning. This is a popular course yet also a basic core requirement that students must take. However, most come into the course with the predisposition that it will be boring and have no application for their career or life. After attending a recent conference on introductory based lab education, the idea was born to update some of the current lab materials in this course. Materials currently used are almost two decades old and do not reflect a lot of the recent advances made in biology. We aim to introduce guided inquiry based labs that are up-to-date and relevant to everyday life. The overall purpose of this project is to provide innovate and creative lab experiences for non-science focused students while initiating engaging lab modules that will replace our current passive learning set up.

Speakers
SB

Swapna Bhat

Univeristy of North Georgia
LP

Linda Purvis

University of North Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P16-Don't Just Guess, Assess: Measures for Community Engaged Learning
Kirsten Rodgers, Scott Butler

Community engagement is an integral component for the development and practice of high level cognitive skills that are introduced in the classroom. Assessment of community engagement in curricular or co-curricular activities can be abstract. A model for assessing public health community engagement activities within a liberal arts framework and the use of a standard professional practice measure can provide the structure needed to assess student critical thinking skills. In this presentation, faculty and students will present how community engagement in a liberal arts college is increasing public health students' critical thinking and communication abilities. Description and assessment of community engagement activities in obesity prevention and sexual health will be discussed.

Speakers
SB

Scott Butler

Georgia College
KR

Kirsten Rodgers

Georgia College & State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P17-A Scalable Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experience in Molecular Parasitology for Producing Competent Graduates: Grounding Student Perceptions with Core Competencies
Michael Sanderson, Nancy Russell, Mariya Campbell, Therese Poole, Paul Ulrich

Studies have shown that providing undergraduates with research experience can lead to persistence in STEM fields. We propose a scalable course-based undergraduate research experience (CURE) in molecular parasitology that blends bioinformatics analysis and molecular experimentation. Science literacy, self-directed learning, critical thinking, and ability to develop argument were monitored using coding-rubrics for writing assignments, journal club reports, and weekly learning logs. The CURE survey (Lopatto et al.) was modified to provide pre- and post-course measurement of perceptual gains in student skills, confidence, and science identity. Analysis of the initial cohort enrolled in the study, indicate that gains in competence and self-directed learning are aligned with self-reported gains in science identity and scientific competence. We anticipate that our CURE will inform efforts to build high-impact platforms for undergraduate research that can be scaled up throughout USG.


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P18-Student Perceptions of Critical Thinking Writing Assignments in Non-Major Science Courses
Ryan Tainsh

Two critical thinking writing assignments were implemented in non-major science courses and student perceptions of these assignments were measured. Each assignment was based on a documentary film involving evolution. Both assignments reinforced evolution, critical thinking skills, and the relevance of evolution. Students from two courses were asked to respond to perception surveys regarding both assignments. Students reported that critical thinking assignments and non-exam evaluations are appropriate for a non-major science course. Additionally, students reported that each assignment increased their knowledge for the topic, fostered critical thinking skills, and promoted creativity. This work shows that students value assignments that reinforce skills, provide context to course topics, and provide an alternative to traditional course exams. These data provide an opportunity to investigate the effect of such assignments on the performance of students in non-major science courses.

Speakers
RT

Ryan Tainsh

Johnson & Wales University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P19-The Advantages of a Student's Vantage Point
Monica Williams Smith

Consulting is a well-known profession in which professionals offer suggestions to improve a company's current practices. In New Venture Management, students engage in the thought process of how entrepreneurs create and design viable business ideas. As a class exercise, a fairly new business owner invited students into their world and shared problems experienced since creating the business. Using the information learned in the course coupled with critical thinking, students worked in teams and created strategies to assist the entrepreneur. In this presentation, the audience will be presented with the information about this class exercise and the outcome of the student/entrepreneur interaction.

Speakers
MS

Monica Smith

University of West Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P20-Service Learning and Critical Thinking in an Introduction to Social Problems Course
Margaret Williamson

How can I incorporate Service-learning in my class? How can I use Service-learning to foster critical thinking skills? What are classroom-management techniques I can use to be successful? These are some questions to ask when considering this type of project. Service-learning is considered a High Impact Practice and a way to engage students in the classroom and in their community. In addition, Service-learning is a way to foster critical thinking skills. This presentation will focus on how Service-learning can create critical thinking opportunities for students, the three questions asked above, as well as how L. Dee Fink's Taxonomy of Significant Learning can be incorporated. Lastly, incorporating Service-learning into a class can provide an opportunity for research. This will be discussed briefly. The intended audience includes faculty interested in Service-learning and critical thinking.

Speakers
MW

Margaret Williamson

University of North Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P21-Stabitha and the Amateur Strategists: Using Tabletop RPGs for Team Building
Aaron Wimer, Morgan Rhetts, and Ana Guimaraes

This session is devoted to how using role playing games (namely Dungeons and Dragons) has boosted employee bonding and team building in two consolidating universities. While cultural difference remain between the staffs, they are being eroded as the staffs create a common environmental experience (role playing games). Meet ups are monthly, and involve between 10 and 15 librarians and library staff. These kind of games encourage outside of the box thinking, problem solving, teamwork, and learning about each other both as an individual and a team member. With the renewed popularity in tabletop gaming and the encouragement of library administrators, we were able to create a unit of highly motivated and flexible employees who are already comfortable working with one another and have come up with some creative solutions to issues in our libraries.

Speakers
avatar for Ana Guimaraes

Ana Guimaraes

Director of Collection Development, Kennesaw State University Library System
Ana Guimaraes is the Director of Collection Development for the Kennesaw State University Library System. She has a Master of Science in Library and Information Science (MSLIS) from Syracuse University and a Bachelor of Arts in Theatre/English from the State University of New York... Read More →
MR

Morgan Rhetts

Kennesaw State University
AW

Aaron Wimer

Kennesaw State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P22-Infusion of Nanotechnology in General Chemistry II Lab
Xiaomei Zheng, Amir Saheb,Louise Wrensford

General Chemistry Lab courses commonly are taught in a traditional format, in which the labs are presented 'cookbook' style where the students read the instructions and follow the directions to carry out the steps as written. We implemented a research based inquiry lab module on nanotechnology in our general chemistry II lab classes to increase students' engagement, critical thinking skills, problem solving skills, technical skills and collaborative work. The student learning was assessed through pre- and post-lab surveys, pre- and post-lab tests and lab reports with pre- and post-lab assignments. Results indicated a significant improvement in the understanding of experimental techniques. According to survey data, students expressed an increase in confidence in understanding the experimental techniques, and 60% of students expressed that the overall experience with lab modules on nanotechnology was excellent. This project was supported by an NSF Targeted Infusion Grant #HRD-1436265.

Speakers
AS

Amir Saheb

Albany State University
LW

Louise Wrensford

Albany State University
XZ

Xiaomei Zheng

Albany State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P23-An Investigation of the Impact of Compiler's Feedback on the Comprehension andPerformance of Computer Programmers
Tamiat Abegaz

A number of research findings indicate that messages displayed to the human operator generally affect the emotion of the operator, which in turn influences the operator's performance in handling a given situation. One of the various challenges students face during programming courses is to diagnose and respond to syntax errors. In most programming languages, compilers or interpreters are the ones that generate the syntax errors. However, the ways the errors were presented mostly resulted in frustration and discouragement, especially for novice programmers. The purpose of this presentation is to explore and propose ways to incorporate low level emotional design elements as part of compiler's feedback to enhance a positive affect, which in turn promotes creative thinking to improve the programmers' performance.

Speakers
TA

Tamiat Abegaz

University of North Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P24-How to Make Online Grading & Feedback More Efficient and Effective
Li-Mei Chen, Chunlei Liu

If you teach online, have you ever felt overwhelmed by the amount of student submissions waiting for you to grade? Have you felt frustrated with students' repetitive errors even though they have been marked and commented upon? If you answer yes to either of the questions, come to this session. With much online teaching experience, we will share with you numerous tips and strategies to make your online grading more effective and efficient. We will also demonstrate how to embed reflection as a feedback dialogue to communicate with students online to improve their writing. Finally, we will share how online instructors can use a systematic method to track their students' performance and guide their own instruction to reflect different student needs.

Speakers
LC

Li-Mei Chen, Chunlei Liu

VALDOSTA STATE UNIVERSITY, USA
CL

Chunlei Liu, Li-Mei Chen, Jun Zhang

VALDOSTA STATE UNIVERSITY, USA


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P25-Critical Thinking and Student Engagement: Metacognitive Writing Strategies That Reach Them All
Alecia Dressel, Paulette Harris, Mary Banks-Murray, Nai-Cheng Kuo, Carissa Parrish, Marissa Powers, Andrea Shervette

Through our participation in the Georgia Milestones Workshop, sponsored by the Teacher Quality Grant, we have been able to implement writing strategies across multiple grade levels, diverse student populations, content areas, and school systems. At this session, we will discuss various research-based writing practices that have improved our students' critical thinking skills. Our goal for this session is to share writing practices that we have seen improve student engagement and develop critical thinking skills as they become more successful writers. Through continued efforts to find multiple pathways to reach students at their current levels, we are able to guide them to higher levels of academic success.

Speakers
MB

Mary Banks-Murray

Thomson McDuffie Middle School, McDuffie County, GA
AD

Alecia Dressel

Augusta University
avatar for Paulette Harris

Paulette Harris

Higher Education Faculty, Augusta University
Dr. Harris holds the Cree-Walker Endowed Chair in the College of Education at Augusta University. She created courses on Grants writing and Philanthropic Development. She leads groups on a regular basis on how-to-write grants. She is the founder and director of the Augusta University's... Read More →
NK

Nai-Cheng Kuo

Augusta University
CP

Carissa Parrish

Sue Reynolds Elementary, Richmond County, GA
MP

Marissa Powers

Mildred E. Freeman Elementary, Warren County, GA
AS

Andrea Shervette

Mildred E. Freeman Elementary, Warren County, GA


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P27-How Using Web Design to Explore Authors, Literary Periods, and Texts in American Literature Effectively Engages Students in Scholarly Research
Joanna Grisham

For this project, students work in pairs to conduct scholarly research about an author and design a website that other students or teachers could use for scholarly purposes. The authors' works designated for the project are in the public domain, so texts are linkable and available for scholarly pursuits. This project requires extensive research and writing and takes the place of a traditional research paper, while offering students an opportunity to engage in serious scholarship. The emphasis on scholarly research highlights the value of retrieving information from reliable sources. The project culminates with a presentation; students show their website to the class and discuss the content, as well as any interesting information uncovered during the research process. Students find this project engaging, informative, and more useful than writing an essay, as they enjoy working with technology and participating in a collaborative activity that is creative and scholarly.

Speakers
JG

Joanna Grisham

Central Georgia Technical College


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P28-UNG Online Student Readiness Implementation – SmarterMeasure
Stephanie Hulsey, Merci Rivera

Determining a student’s readiness for online instruction is paramount to their success. In order to make this determination at the University of North Georgia, the SmarterMeasure Readiness Assessment was piloted in July 2013, with full implementation following in August, 2014. We will share our experiences with implementation, and share our data as it compares to the SmarterMeasure National Student Readiness Report. We hope our experience can help those who are contemplating or beginning to use the SmarterMeasure assessment.

Speakers
avatar for Merciaileen Rivera Almodóvar

Merciaileen Rivera Almodóvar

University of North Georgia
avatar for Stephanie Hulsey

Stephanie Hulsey

Coordinator of Online Student Success, University of North Georgia
Student Success Statistics, Online Readiness / Preparation, Online Student Services and Orientation


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P29-E-Commerce Teaching Via Project-Based Learning Advances USG STEM Goals
Kamal Kakish, Yaquan Xu

In this presentation, the authors describe the teaching of e-commerce as a project based. The e-commerce project based learning is designed and implemented at Georgia Gwinnett College for undergraduate Information Technology and Business students. The teaching objectives of this course are to develop the students' knowledge and skills, in the use of e-commerce site building tools, teamwork, and entrepreneurship. The authors focus on real-life situations and challenges, offer exposure to major considerations involved in e-commerce systems, and facilitate understanding of e-commerce implementation strategies from both business and technology perspectives. The results of student surveys indicate that the project-based teamwork approach to teaching e-commerce accomplishes its goals. The students' feedback as well as the authors' experience indicate that students enjoy the collaborative part of the course and the benefits from the creativity and self-direction.

Speakers
KK

Kamal Kakish

Assistant Dean, Georgia Gwinnett College
e-Commerce; Open-source SW; Project Based Learning
YX

Yaquan Xu

Georgia Gwinnett College


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P30-The Effects of Education Abroad and Education Abroad in Sustainability on Levels of Student Engagement
Adam Landon, Donald Rubin, Michael Tarrant

Student learning is in part a function of engagement. However, not all environments are conducive to student engagement. Study abroad (SA) is one mechanism identified to enhance student engagement. Additionally, it has been hypothesized that SA in sustainability, where students critically reflect on their beliefs, may yield higher engagement. In this investigation we test the added value of SA and SA in sustainability on engagement. In a 2x2x2 factorial design we empirically test the effects of time (pre-post) location (abroad-home campus) and content (sustainability - non-sustainability) on student engagement. Results indicate SA programs achieve higher levels of student engagement than courses on campus, and that sustainability content may facilitate engagement. These results have implications for the positioning of education abroad within higher education as a means to give students broader global perspectives, and as a mechanism for more effective student engagement.

Speakers
AL

Adam Landon

University of Georgia
DR

Donald Rubin

University of Georgia
MT

Michael Tarrant

University of Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P31-A Flipped Classroom - Peer-led Team Learning Reform to Promote Student Success in Large Organic Chemistry Courses
Suazette Mooring, Joan Mutanyatta-Coma

Organic Chemistry is a critical course for students pursuing undergraduate degrees in STEM. This course has traditionally been challenging and can discourage many students from continuing in STEM degrees. Given the high failure rates for this course, it is imperative that we find curriculum innovations that will improve the performance of students from all backgrounds in this course. To this end, we have implemented flipped classroom-Peer-led Team Learning (PLTL) reform model in the high enrollment Organic Chemistry courses at our institution. Herein, we will present the preliminary results of this implementation on two sections of Organic Chemistry. The results of the reform on students' attitude and perceptions toward the course format and on student performance will be discussed. This presentation is intended for STEM or related faculty interested in the outcomes and implementation of active-learning strategies.

Speakers
SM

Suazette Mooring

Associate Professor, Georgia State University
Chemistry Education Researcher. Organic Chemist


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P32-BioCalculus - A Classroom Flip that is Truly Reflective
Rebecca Rizzo

APOS theory emphasizes that learning through reflection is the key to strengthening critical thinking skills and achieving a higher order of thinking. This presentation examines the reflection strategies used in the GSU BioCalculus course sequence to gain increased conceptual knowledge by students and hence overall success rate in the course. Using a combination of lecture, grading and pedagogical shifts, it has become possible to create a flipped classroom that is reflective while measuring the student's analysis skills and ability to apply their learning to their lives. The intended audience is any mathematics instructor from grades 6 through 12 as well as University level.

Speakers
RR

Rebecca Rizzo

Georgia College & State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P33-Exploring and Challenging Gender Stereotypes with Pre-Service Teachers
Kinga Varga-Dobai, Shelly Black, James Kelley, Amy Boldin

This poster session will feature best practices used with pre-service teachers in an early childhood literacy course to develop critical thinking skills, specifically in relation to representations of gender issues in literature and other text in the curriculum. The presenter of this session will showcase the various ways in which pre-service teachers addressed the issue of gender stereotyping and gender roles from a historical perspective. From critical discussions of picture books displaying gender stereotypes, to digital projects on gender representation, as well as lesson plan ideas on the topic of women’s suffrage movement in the early childhood curriculum, this poster session will rely on original student work. Intended audience of this session: classroom teachers and university instructors.

Speakers
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Kinga Varga-Dobai

Assistant professor, Georgia Gwinnett College


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P34-Connecting Language Learners with Native Speakers
Sabrina Wengier

This session is aimed primarily at language instructors. This session will address the benefits and challenges of including regular guided conversations with native speakers to an intermediate language course curriculum. This session will also consider the impact of such conversations on students' oral proficiency and whether regular interaction with native speakers outside of class helps lower anxiety in speaking.

Speakers
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Sabrina Wengier

Middle Georgia State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P35-Ethical & Best Practices in On-line Teaching and Communication
Angela Wilson

At a time where synchronous and/or asynchronous on-line class instruction is becoming more and more significant amongst colleges and universities across the country and internationally; the need for a more structured and systematic approach to on-line teaching is becoming more apparent as well. The session will explore best practices and effective approaches to the on-line instructional environment. Topics the presenters will explore include: Ethics and communication, Instructional designs, and Technology implementation. The session would be beneficial to both the beginning on-line instructor as well as the advanced on-line educator looking to enhance overall student learning and engagement.

Speakers
avatar for Angela Wilson

Angela Wilson

Savannah State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P36-Implementing an Online Solution to a Low Enrollment College Algebra Learning Support Class
Mary Wolfe

When faced with a mandate to implement a new learning support class with low enrollment across multiple campuses, an online solution seemed in order, especially since we had no idea if any students at all would be eligible for enrollment. Vendor online solutions were evaluated and selected so that the support course complemented the gateway course while engaging the students. The result was 14 enrolled students from across 3 campuses. Data was collected and analyzed. Lessons learned will be discussed.

Speakers
MW

Mary Wolfe

Middle Georgia State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P37-Discovering the "Tipping Point": The Surprising Effects of Tutorial Visits on Student GPA and Self-Efficacy

Eliot Rendleman, Emily Reed

Many instructors assume that tutoring only contributes to academic success. Research in writing center studies appears to support such assumptions. Studies have reported increases in intrinsic motivation, positive attitudes about mandatory visits, retention rates, number of student drafts, higher assignment and course grades, and confidence. Although the assumptions and data-driven research seem irrefutable, recent research uncovers evidence that suggests too many tutorial visits may undermine the efforts to support Complete College Georgia initiative. In this poster session, the presenters will reveal a tutorial visitation threshold found at one writing center. Sharing their original, data-driven research, this professor and student research team will demonstrate that too many visits to writing tutorial services may result in lower grades and self-efficacy. The audience members are invited to share their experience and to interrogate collaboratively the methods and results of the session.



Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria