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USG Teaching and Learning Conference: Best Practices for Promoting Engaged Student Learning

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Poster Session [clear filter]
Wednesday, April 13
 

5:00pm EDT

P03-Using Strategic Partnerships to Maximize Critical Thinking and Creating Collaborations
Joy Humphrey, Michelle Dykes

Because of limited budgets and faculty shortage, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) has recommended the use of strategic partnerships between hospitals and nursing schools. These partnerships offer opportunities to create a highly educated nursing workforce, bridge the faculty shortage gap, and strengthen clinical connections with area healthcare agencies. This presentation will discuss a recently initiated strategic partnership aimed at educating senior nursing students in hands-on advanced cardiac life support (ACLS). A one-day, clinical simulation, facilitated by healthcare agency nurse educators, ACLS instructors, and nursing faculty, is provided to allow students a hands-on experience with witnessing, running, and participating in a code blue situation. Future plans for this collaboration, including facilitating continuing education of healthcare agency employees, will also be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Michelle Dykes

Michelle Dykes

Georgia Southwestern State University
JH

Joy Humphrey

Georgia Southwestern State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P04-Assessing Student Preparedness for Writing in the Sciences: A Case Study from a Joint Undergraduate/Graduate Ecology Course
Kaitlin Farrell

Instructors expect that by the time students enroll in 4000/6000 level science courses, they will have experience in scientific writing. As a result, assignments in upper-level science courses may focus on high-stakes written products without determining whether students have the skills needed to successfully complete the assignments. We studied students enrolled in a 4000/6000 level Ecology course to assess the skills that students have upon entering the class (i.e., previously learned skills), the effectiveness of low-stakes course activities in increasing student preparedness for and success in completing summative assignments, and student perceptions of the effectiveness of course activities in preparing them for success on assignments. Understanding how prior student learning experiences do or do not match instructor perceptions of student preparedness for different types of assignments will help maximize student engagement and success in writing in higher-level science courses.

Speakers
KF

Kaitlin Farrell

University of Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P05-Mark Twain and his 'Fable' on Critical Reading
Jason Horn

Showing how a dramatic reading can work to engage students in both reading and writing in composition classes, this presentation offers a review of a course focused on a short tale of Mark Twain's: "A Fable." While dramatically reading Twain's tale about stubborn and argumentative animals, students actively participate in debate as they defend their given animal roles and analyze and evaluate the viewpoints of other characters. This active reading prepares students to analyze and evaluate further readings and their own compositions.

Speakers
JH

Jason Horn

Professor of English, Gordon State College


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P06-Evaluating Honors Program Requirements in Response to Student Needs and Preferences
Matthew Horton, Katherine Kipp

This poster will present findings from surveys administered to Honors Program students enrolled at a two-year, access-oriented, commuter campus of a larger university in order to measure their perceptions of course delivery and program requirements. The presenters developed these surveys in response to low program retention and student frustrations related to time commitment. Based on the data, pathways are suggested for helping these students maximize the academic benefits of Honors Program participation, especially the importance of undergraduate research initiatives that foster critical thinking skills. Attendees will be encouraged to exchange ideas about Honors curriculum, undergraduate research support and scaffolding, and building campus community around academic excellence. Despite its emphasis on Honors Program administration, this poster will be helpful to any faculty or staff looking for strategies that enhance student learning at a variety of institution types.

Speakers
MH

Matthew Horton

University of North Georgia
KK

Katherine Kipp

University of North Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P08-Faculty Perceptions of INQR 1000 Student Learning: Are They Engaged or Just Flirting?
Elizabeth Huggins

INQR 1000 is a discussion-based course designed to encourage first and second year students to use active learning and critical inquiry to create questions about a particular topic of interest and present their findings in an academic EXPO. Over 1000 undergraduate students have reported their success in developing the INQR 1000 skills which include: asking relevant questions; collecting appropriate resources; engaging in positive and meaningful discussions; contributing effectively to a group. We recently asked INQR faculty how they perceived students' development in terms of the learning outcomes. What resulted was surprising. This presentation would be ideal for audiences interested in student-directed learning, and the impact of faculty-student interaction for achieving learning outcomes. It would also be relevant for professionals interested in developing a topic-driven critical thinking course for undergraduate students.

Speakers
EH

Elizabeth Huggins

Director of First & Second Year Experiences, Augusta University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P09-Effect of Nanoparticles on Brine Shrimps - A Course Embedded Model to Integrate Research Based Projects into the Science Curriculum
ByungHoon Kim, Anta'Sha Jones, Louise Wrensford

Many institutions incorporate research activities into the undergraduate curriculum with known positive outcomes. We developed a way to incorporate a series of research projects with a common theme in various science courses that are vertically aligned. Through courses from freshmen to senior years, students are exposed to specially designed research projects related to nanotechnology. Here, we report a remodeling of a General Biology Lab course for Biology majors. In contrast to traditional lab activities, our course material includes a four-week research project, Effect of Nanoparticles on Brine Shrimps. Through this inquiry-based project, students design, execute and analyze data in an experiment to test the toxicity of silver nanoparticles using brine shrimps. We discuss the improvement of students learning outcome and their behavioral change toward science. Intended audience is high school and college level science educators. Supported by NSF Targeted Infusion Grant #HRD-1436265

Speakers
AJ

Anta'Sha Jones

Albany State University
BK

ByungHoon Kim

Albany State University
LW

Louise Wrensford

Albany State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P10-Enhancing Students' Engagement, Confidence, and Performance Through the Half-Semester Research-Based Laboratory
Yong Jin Lee

Typical science curricula use traditional cookbooks for the laboratory courses, which may result in students' lack of understanding of science in those courses. To address this problem and to enhance students' hands-on experience and critical thinking, the half-semester research-based laboratory was implemented in a microbiology course. After learning basic microbiological techniques, students explored a research topic by submitting a research proposal, conducting a research independently, and submitting a final report. Based on the pre- and post-lab exams, students did not show significant improvement after the research activity; however, the post-survey found that students clearly showed more positive attitudes toward the course and high confidence in laboratory tasks. During the presentation, the structure and components of research-based laboratory will be discussed and the outcomes will be shared with the audience who want to implement research-based activity in their courses.

Speakers
YJ

Yong Jin Lee

Albany State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P12-Increasing Self-Regulated Learning in the Millennial Classroom
Jessica McCain, Michelle vanDellen

College teachers are increasingly concerned about a lack of self-regulation in Millennial students. We tested an intervention to increase self-regulated learning in 71 undergraduate students from a psychology statistics course. At the beginning and end of the semester, we measured narcissism, entitlement, external locus of control, helicopter parenting, achievement goal orientation, and several study strategies and beliefs about learning using the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ). Half of the participants received the intervention first, while the other participants completed practice problems. At midterm, all participants switched conditions. For the intervention, participants completed a worksheet each week identifying a problem area in the material and making a plan to address this area in the coming week. The group receiving the intervention first earned significantly higher final grades. Mediation analyses suggest that a decrease in external locus of control drove this difference.

Speakers
JM

Jessica McCain

University of Georgia
MV

Michelle vanDellen

University of Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P14-The 'Write' Stuff: Promoting Critical Thinking with Student-Authored Reading Cards
Katherine Perrotta

This session illustrates how to promote engagement and critical thinking about course readings with student authored reading cards. Students were assigned to write questions about assigned chapters from the course text. The presenter will describe the process in which the reading cards were assigned, and how to use the reading cards as discussion prompts, debate topics, and short-answer options for course assessments. The presenter will provide index cards and sample readings for participants to try the activity and discuss how they can adapt this activity for their own classes.

Speakers
KP

Katherine Perrotta

Kennesaw State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P18-Student Perceptions of Critical Thinking Writing Assignments in Non-Major Science Courses
Ryan Tainsh

Two critical thinking writing assignments were implemented in non-major science courses and student perceptions of these assignments were measured. Each assignment was based on a documentary film involving evolution. Both assignments reinforced evolution, critical thinking skills, and the relevance of evolution. Students from two courses were asked to respond to perception surveys regarding both assignments. Students reported that critical thinking assignments and non-exam evaluations are appropriate for a non-major science course. Additionally, students reported that each assignment increased their knowledge for the topic, fostered critical thinking skills, and promoted creativity. This work shows that students value assignments that reinforce skills, provide context to course topics, and provide an alternative to traditional course exams. These data provide an opportunity to investigate the effect of such assignments on the performance of students in non-major science courses.

Speakers
RT

Ryan Tainsh

Johnson & Wales University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P19-The Advantages of a Student's Vantage Point
Monica Williams Smith

Consulting is a well-known profession in which professionals offer suggestions to improve a company's current practices. In New Venture Management, students engage in the thought process of how entrepreneurs create and design viable business ideas. As a class exercise, a fairly new business owner invited students into their world and shared problems experienced since creating the business. Using the information learned in the course coupled with critical thinking, students worked in teams and created strategies to assist the entrepreneur. In this presentation, the audience will be presented with the information about this class exercise and the outcome of the student/entrepreneur interaction.

Speakers
MS

Monica Smith

University of West Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P20-Service Learning and Critical Thinking in an Introduction to Social Problems Course
Margaret Williamson

How can I incorporate Service-learning in my class? How can I use Service-learning to foster critical thinking skills? What are classroom-management techniques I can use to be successful? These are some questions to ask when considering this type of project. Service-learning is considered a High Impact Practice and a way to engage students in the classroom and in their community. In addition, Service-learning is a way to foster critical thinking skills. This presentation will focus on how Service-learning can create critical thinking opportunities for students, the three questions asked above, as well as how L. Dee Fink's Taxonomy of Significant Learning can be incorporated. Lastly, incorporating Service-learning into a class can provide an opportunity for research. This will be discussed briefly. The intended audience includes faculty interested in Service-learning and critical thinking.

Speakers
MW

Margaret Williamson

University of North Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P22-Infusion of Nanotechnology in General Chemistry II Lab
Xiaomei Zheng, Amir Saheb,Louise Wrensford

General Chemistry Lab courses commonly are taught in a traditional format, in which the labs are presented 'cookbook' style where the students read the instructions and follow the directions to carry out the steps as written. We implemented a research based inquiry lab module on nanotechnology in our general chemistry II lab classes to increase students' engagement, critical thinking skills, problem solving skills, technical skills and collaborative work. The student learning was assessed through pre- and post-lab surveys, pre- and post-lab tests and lab reports with pre- and post-lab assignments. Results indicated a significant improvement in the understanding of experimental techniques. According to survey data, students expressed an increase in confidence in understanding the experimental techniques, and 60% of students expressed that the overall experience with lab modules on nanotechnology was excellent. This project was supported by an NSF Targeted Infusion Grant #HRD-1436265.

Speakers
AS

Amir Saheb

Albany State University
LW

Louise Wrensford

Albany State University
XZ

Xiaomei Zheng

Albany State University


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P23-An Investigation of the Impact of Compiler's Feedback on the Comprehension andPerformance of Computer Programmers
Tamiat Abegaz

A number of research findings indicate that messages displayed to the human operator generally affect the emotion of the operator, which in turn influences the operator's performance in handling a given situation. One of the various challenges students face during programming courses is to diagnose and respond to syntax errors. In most programming languages, compilers or interpreters are the ones that generate the syntax errors. However, the ways the errors were presented mostly resulted in frustration and discouragement, especially for novice programmers. The purpose of this presentation is to explore and propose ways to incorporate low level emotional design elements as part of compiler's feedback to enhance a positive affect, which in turn promotes creative thinking to improve the programmers' performance.

Speakers
TA

Tamiat Abegaz

University of North Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P25-Critical Thinking and Student Engagement: Metacognitive Writing Strategies That Reach Them All
Alecia Dressel, Paulette Harris, Mary Banks-Murray, Nai-Cheng Kuo, Carissa Parrish, Marissa Powers, Andrea Shervette

Through our participation in the Georgia Milestones Workshop, sponsored by the Teacher Quality Grant, we have been able to implement writing strategies across multiple grade levels, diverse student populations, content areas, and school systems. At this session, we will discuss various research-based writing practices that have improved our students' critical thinking skills. Our goal for this session is to share writing practices that we have seen improve student engagement and develop critical thinking skills as they become more successful writers. Through continued efforts to find multiple pathways to reach students at their current levels, we are able to guide them to higher levels of academic success.

Speakers
MB

Mary Banks-Murray

Thomson McDuffie Middle School, McDuffie County, GA
AD

Alecia Dressel

Augusta University
avatar for Paulette Harris

Paulette Harris

Higher Education Faculty, Augusta University
Dr. Harris holds the Cree-Walker Endowed Chair in the College of Education at Augusta University. She created courses on Grants writing and Philanthropic Development. She leads groups on a regular basis on how-to-write grants. She is the founder and director of the Augusta University's... Read More →
NK

Nai-Cheng Kuo

Augusta University
CP

Carissa Parrish

Sue Reynolds Elementary, Richmond County, GA
MP

Marissa Powers

Mildred E. Freeman Elementary, Warren County, GA
AS

Andrea Shervette

Mildred E. Freeman Elementary, Warren County, GA


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P29-E-Commerce Teaching Via Project-Based Learning Advances USG STEM Goals
Kamal Kakish, Yaquan Xu

In this presentation, the authors describe the teaching of e-commerce as a project based. The e-commerce project based learning is designed and implemented at Georgia Gwinnett College for undergraduate Information Technology and Business students. The teaching objectives of this course are to develop the students' knowledge and skills, in the use of e-commerce site building tools, teamwork, and entrepreneurship. The authors focus on real-life situations and challenges, offer exposure to major considerations involved in e-commerce systems, and facilitate understanding of e-commerce implementation strategies from both business and technology perspectives. The results of student surveys indicate that the project-based teamwork approach to teaching e-commerce accomplishes its goals. The students' feedback as well as the authors' experience indicate that students enjoy the collaborative part of the course and the benefits from the creativity and self-direction.

Speakers
KK

Kamal Kakish

Assistant Dean, Georgia Gwinnett College
e-Commerce; Open-source SW; Project Based Learning
YX

Yaquan Xu

Georgia Gwinnett College


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P30-The Effects of Education Abroad and Education Abroad in Sustainability on Levels of Student Engagement
Adam Landon, Donald Rubin, Michael Tarrant

Student learning is in part a function of engagement. However, not all environments are conducive to student engagement. Study abroad (SA) is one mechanism identified to enhance student engagement. Additionally, it has been hypothesized that SA in sustainability, where students critically reflect on their beliefs, may yield higher engagement. In this investigation we test the added value of SA and SA in sustainability on engagement. In a 2x2x2 factorial design we empirically test the effects of time (pre-post) location (abroad-home campus) and content (sustainability - non-sustainability) on student engagement. Results indicate SA programs achieve higher levels of student engagement than courses on campus, and that sustainability content may facilitate engagement. These results have implications for the positioning of education abroad within higher education as a means to give students broader global perspectives, and as a mechanism for more effective student engagement.

Speakers
AL

Adam Landon

University of Georgia
DR

Donald Rubin

University of Georgia
MT

Michael Tarrant

University of Georgia


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria

5:00pm EDT

P33-Exploring and Challenging Gender Stereotypes with Pre-Service Teachers
Kinga Varga-Dobai, Shelly Black, James Kelley, Amy Boldin

This poster session will feature best practices used with pre-service teachers in an early childhood literacy course to develop critical thinking skills, specifically in relation to representations of gender issues in literature and other text in the curriculum. The presenter of this session will showcase the various ways in which pre-service teachers addressed the issue of gender stereotyping and gender roles from a historical perspective. From critical discussions of picture books displaying gender stereotypes, to digital projects on gender representation, as well as lesson plan ideas on the topic of women’s suffrage movement in the early childhood curriculum, this poster session will rely on original student work. Intended audience of this session: classroom teachers and university instructors.

Speakers
KV

Kinga Varga-Dobai

Assistant professor, Georgia Gwinnett College


Wednesday April 13, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT
Hill Atrium/Pecan Tree Galleria